Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKaufman, Michael J.
dc.contributor.authorNuechterlein, Jacob
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T05:36:19Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-09T08:40:56Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T05:36:19Z
dc.date.available2022-02-09T08:40:56Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifierT 7316
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/79458
dc.description2013 Summer.
dc.descriptionIncludes illustrations (some color).
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 48-52).
dc.description.abstractSelf-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) is a self-sustaining combustion reaction of reactant powders typically in the form of compacted pellets to form a desired product species. The reactants are ignited in one or more locations by several different techniques. After ignition the reaction travels as a wave through the pellet exothermically converting the reactants into products as it propagates. In this case the products are formed as discrete ceramic particles of TiC, Al2O3 and SiC. The goal of this research was to reduce the size of the particles formed by this technique from a diameter of 1-5[mu]m to less than 100nm with the goal of then incorporating these nanoparticles as reinforcements in Al metal matrix composites. To accomplish this, many different SHS principles were studied and their associated variables were changed to reduce the combustion temperature of each reacting system. Several of these systems were investigated and discarded for a number of reasons such as: low ignition or high combustion temperatures, dangerous reaction conditions, or undesirable product densities and morphologies. The systems chosen exhibited low material costs, low combustion temperatures, and a wide range of stabilities when lowering the reaction temperature. The reacting systems pursued were based around the aluminothermic reduction of TiO2 in the presence of carbon to form TiC and Al2O3. The combustion temperature of this reaction was reduced from 2053ºC to less than 1100ºC, which had a corresponding effect on the particle size of the products, reducing the average diameter of the particles to less than 100nm. This was accomplished by providing high heating rates, controlling the green density and adding diluents to the reaction such as Al, TiC, SiC or Al2O3. Cooling experiments were also investigated, but the cooling rate was found to have no effect on the particle size.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2010-2019 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectSHS
dc.subjectnanoparticles
dc.subjectnanocomposite
dc.subjectMMC
dc.subjectcombustion synthesis
dc.subjectaluminothermic
dc.subject.lcshSelf-propagating high-temperature synthesis
dc.subject.lcshCeramics
dc.subject.lcshMetallic composites
dc.subject.lcshNanoparticles
dc.titleProduction of ceramic nanoparticles through self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) and their introduction into a metallic matrix to form metal matrix composites (MMC)
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.committeememberAyers, Reed A.
dc.contributor.committeememberGorman, Brian P.
dc.contributor.committeememberMustoe, Graham G. W.
dc.contributor.committeememberLin, Jianliang
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineMetallurgical and Materials Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Nuechterlein_mines_0052E_10266.pdf
Size:
9.408Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Production of ceramic nanoparticles ...

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record