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dc.contributor.advisorMaxwell, Reed M.
dc.contributor.authorMeyerhoff, Steven B.
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T04:48:38Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-09T08:53:43Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T04:48:38Z
dc.date.available2022-02-09T08:53:43Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifierT 7198
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/78509
dc.description2013 Spring.
dc.descriptionIncludes illustrations (some color), color maps.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 90-99).
dc.description.abstractGroundwater and surface water historically have been treated as different entities. Due to this, planning and development of groundwater and surface water resources, both quantity and quality are often also treated separately. Recently, there has been work to characterize groundwater and surface water as a single system. Karstic systems are widely influenced by these interactions due to varying permeability, fracture geometry and porosity. Here, three different approaches are used to characterize groundwater surface water interactions in karstic environments. 1) A hydrologic model, ParFlow, is conditioned with known subsurface data to determine whether a reduction in subsurface uncertainty will enhance the prediction of surface water variables. A reduction in subsurface uncertainty resulted in substantial reductions in uncertainty in Hortonian runoff and less reductions in Dunne runoff. 2) Geophysical data is collected at a field site in O'leno State Park, Florida to visualize groundwater and surface water interactions in karstic environments. Significant changes in resistivity are seen through time at two locations. It is hypothesized that these changes are related to changing fluid source waters (e.g groundwater or surface water). 3). To confirm these observations an ensemble of synthetic forward models are simulated, inverted and compared directly with field observations and End-Member-Mixing-Analysis (EMMA). Field observations and synthetic models have comparable resistivity anomalies patterns and mixing fractions. This allows us to characterize and quantify subsurface mixing of groundwater and surface in karst environments. These three approaches (hydrologic models, field data and forward model experiments), (1) show the complexity and dynamics of groundwater and surface mixing in karstic environments in varying flow conditions, (2) showcase a novel geophysical technique to visualize groundwater and surface water interactions and (3) confirm hypothesis of flow and mixing in subsurface karst environments.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2010-2019 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectgeophysics
dc.subjectnumerical modeling
dc.subjectkarst
dc.subjectgroundwater and surface water interactions
dc.subject.lcshHydrology, Karst
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater
dc.subject.lcshAquifers
dc.subject.lcshGeophysics
dc.subject.lcshHydrologic models
dc.titleUnderstanding heterogeneity and data assimilation in karst groundwater surface water interactions: the role of geophysics and hydrologic models in a semi-confined aquifer
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.committeememberCohen, Ronald R. H.
dc.contributor.committeememberRevil, André, 1970-
dc.contributor.committeememberGraham, Wendy D.
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCray, John E.
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineGeology and Geological Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines


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