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dc.contributor.editorGary, James H.
dc.date1986
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T08:23:05Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-09T08:03:25Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T08:23:05Z
dc.date.available2022-02-09T08:03:25Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/71249
dc.descriptionOn cover: 19th oil shale symposium proceedings.
dc.descriptionIncludes illustrations, charts, graphs, tables.
dc.description.abstractFrom the Foreword: The oil shale industry is at the same level of activity it was in the late 1960's. With crude oil in plentiful supply and at low prices there is no feel of urgency to develop a viable synfuels program. In addition, most petroleum companies are severely restricting their research and development programs and the federal government is concerned with cutting spending. As a result most programs have been phased out and the only program still active for western oil shales is that of Union Oil Company at Parachute, Colorado. These conditions affected the 19th Oil Shale Symposium in both attendance and the number of papers available for the sessions. To maintain the quality of the program, it was necessary to restrict the program to two days but the resulting program was exceptionally good. The total attendance was 97 which compares with 389 for the best attended symposium and 83 for the smallest. Unfortunately, both government and industry have very short memories and resort to short-term planning. This has resulted in the rollercoaster history of the shale oil industry. Whenever there is a shortage of petroleum, crash research and development programs are initiated and everyone gets into the act. Later, when crude oil becomes more available, these programs are phased out and the expertise developed is allowed to dissipate. In the long run this is very costly to industry and the government because much of the same work is repeated and new people have to be educated to the needs of the industry. Hopefully, the Oil Shale Symposia will ameliorate some of this loss of expertise by making available the results of much of this work to future workers. Even so, many companies do not permit the presentation of the results of their work because of their concern for divulging proprietary information to their competitors. In many cases this concern is unwarranted and later may work to their disadvantage because it is not available for their own use. Unless there are definite reasons for withholding data, it is to everyone's benefit to publish as much as possible. Once again thanks are due to Richard Poulson and John Dyni who assisted in obtaining papers, the Western Research Institute, and the U.S. Department of Energy who cosponsored the Symposium, and those authors and their employers who provided the papers and presentations which made the 19th Oil Shale Symposium worthwhile. If sufficient good papers are forthcoming, the 20th Oil Shale Symposium will be held on the Mines campus on April 21-22, 1987. I hope to see you here. James H. Gary Director of Symposia and Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
dc.format.mediumreports
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relationcog:8
dc.relation.ispartofPublications - Tell Ertl Oil Shale Repository
dc.rightsCopyright held by Colorado School of Mines.
dc.rightsIn copyright - non-commercial use permitted (http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-NC/1.0/).
dc.subject.lcshOil-shale industry
dc.subject.lcshShale oils
dc.subject.lcshSynthetic fuels
dc.subject.lcshIn situ testing
dc.subject.lcshColorado School of Mines
dc.subject.lcshSymposia and conference proceedings
dc.titleNineteenth oil shale symposium proceedings
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.institutionColorado School of Mines
dc.publisher.originalColorado School of Mines


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