• 16th oil shale symposium proceedings: table of contents

      Gary, James H.; Colorado School of Mines
      From the Foreword: In the foreword of the 15th Oil Shale Symposium Proceedings, it was stated that "barring more unusual and unforeseen circumstances, 1983 will mark the beginning of a sustained commercial industry even though it will be a much slower start than hoped." At the time of the 16th Oil Shale Symposium (April 1983), the crude oil market was soft, crude prices were down, and the refineries were operating at less than 70 percent of capacity. Predictions for future demand of petroleum indicated there would be little improvement in demand before the end of the 1980's and, barring political impacts, there would be no shortage of crude in the near future. The one bright spot in the oil shale picture was the progress in the construction of Union Oil Company of California's 10,000 BPD plant at Parachute. It was predicted the plant would start up on schedule (late summer 1983) and be completed on budget ($660,000,000). The success of the operation of this plant will have a major impact on the future of a commercial shale oil industry and we will be following its performance with interest. The number of informative papers submitted for presentation at the 16th Oil Shale Symposium was much greater than ever before and, as a result, the number of papers presented reached a new peak. With the help of Dick Poulson, Jack Dyni , and Tom Beard, several sessions were added and 58 papers were accepted. It was encouraging that, in spite of the economic climate, attendance at the 16th Oil Shale Symposium was average for a symposium and strong interest continues. Over the 20 years of the symposia, we have seen many fluctuations in oil shale activity and, if past trends prevail, interest in shale oil will be down for a while but there will be an upturn. The encouraging indicators with respect to the economy as a whole are reasons to be optimistic for the future health of shale oil. However, the next few years will be of critical importance to the orderly development of a viable shale oil industry. James H. Gary Director of Symposia and Professor of Chemical and Petroleum- Refining Engineering.
    • 17th oil shale symposium proceedings: table of contents

      Gary, James H.; Colorado School of Mines
      From the Foreword: Although the 17th Oil Shale Symposium was held this year, 1984 is actually the 20th Anniversary of the 1st Oil Shale Symposium which was held in the Denver Hilton Hotel on April 30th and May 1st, 1964. The 1st Symposium was held as a result of the leasing of the Anvil Points facility of the U.S. Bureau of Mines by the Colorado School of Mines Research Institute to "investigate the technical feasibility of certain mining, crushing, and retorting techniques for oil shale." The investigation was sponsored by Socony Mobil Oil Company and Humble Oil and Refining Company. It is of interest to note that one of the paper was titled "Oil Shale Development Handicapped by Government Indecision" (given by The Honorable Wayne N. Aspinall, Congressman from Colorado). Although there is still a more than adequate supply of government indecision, there has been a great deal of progress over the last 20 years and solutions have been developed for many of the technical, environmental, and socioeconomic problems known at that time. Since then many new problems have been discovered, and papers given at the 17th Oil Shale Symposium reflect the effort to provide solutions to known problems, as well as to problems that might occur. It is encouraging that work is still continuing even though the potential oil shale industry is at a low point in its roller coaster cycle of development. A great deal is riding on the efforts of Union Oil Company of California in operating their bottom feed retort in Parachute. The technical and economic data obtained from their operation will be the yardsticks to compare the costs of shale oil from Green River shales with those of developing an equivalent amount of new crude oil for U.S. consumption. Papers at this Symposium show that progress is being made in quantizing many of the technical, environmental, and health aspects involved in developing a viable shale oil industry. When the industry does develop, it will be one of the most studied industries in the history of the world. If as much thought was placed on political issues, there is a very good chance that Thomas Jefferson and his cohorts would still be wrestling with the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution would be several more centuries down the road. Thanks are due to the speakers, authors, companies, and attendees who made this meeting possible. I look forward to your participation next year. James H. Gary Director of Symposia and Professor of Chemical and Petroleum-Refining Engineering.
    • 18th oil shale symposium proceedings (table of contents and two conference papers)

      Gary, James H.; Colorado School of Mines
      From the Forward: This year is a critical one for the commercial development of oil shale because so much depends upon the successful operation of the Union Oil Company of California plant at Parachute. With the soft crude market and the corresponding drop in prices of crude oil there is little incentive to invest large sums of money into the development of alternate sources of liquid fuels. Union's difficulties in getting their demonstration unit into continuous production has made the situation even more grim. The atmosphere is very much like that of the late 1960's when almost everyone put shale oil development on hold and invested their funds into what appeared to be more promising areas. Even so, there is a continuing strong interest in the commercialization of shale oil development as evidenced by the attendance of over 200 at the joint 18th Oil Shale Symposium and First Western Synfuels Symposium held for the first time in Grand Junction. Among those attending, there was a strong belief that it is essential to continue with the orderly development of shale processing programs in order to provide the technology necessary for commercial size operations. The problems besetting Union serve to emphasize that small-scale operations do not reveal many of the problems encountered in commercial -scale operations and the only way to insure success is to try processing at commercial -scale levels. Hopefully, industry and government sources will continue to support shale oil development so that when the technology is needed, we will be in a position to establish the industry with minimum impacts on the environment and the economy. If the saga of shale oil development continues as in the past, it will be only a short time before there is another increase in interest and funds available and more incentives to develop the industry. During each period of activity, further advances are made and a successful operation becomes that much closer. In the meantime, it is necessary that work continue so that shorter lead times will be needed to arrive at a successful conclusion. James H. Gary Director of Symposia and Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining.
    • 21 retorting proposals

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      The United States Bureau of Mines facility at Anvil Points, near Rifle, Colorado, was reactivated starting in May 1964 and was operated during 1965, 1966, and 1967. A research and development program was conducted to investigate the technical feasibility of room-and-pillar mining with explosives, crushing and Gas-Combustion Retorting techniques for oil shale. Mobil Oil Corporation acted as Project Manager for the cooperative industry group at Rifle which included Continental Oil Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Phillips Petroleum Company, and Sinclair Research, Inc. as Participating Parties. The runs recorded from the Gas Combustion No. 3 Retort are part of the Technical Memorandum reported to the Technical Advisory Committee. The primary object of the Anvil Points Oil Shale Research Center Technical memorandum is to advise authorized personnel employed by the Participating Parties that various activities are in progress or that certain significant data have been obtained within the Research Center. Costs of the Rifle operation were shared equally by the six participants. Each Participating Party was represented by personnel on the technical staff. The Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. acted as lessor-of-record and supplied nontechnical personnel for administrative and logistic support.
    • 24th oil shale symposium proceedings: table of contents

      Gary, James H.; Colorado School of Mines
      From the foreword of this issue: The 24th Annual Oil Shale Symposium was held at a time when the future of commercial shale oil production was very uncertain. Shortly before the Symposium, Unocal Corporation announced that the Parachute Creek oil shale operation was to cease operation as of July 1, 1991, and the company did not plan to reopen the facility. This effectively closed the only commercial shale oil operation in the United States. Fred Hartly, former President and Chairman of the Board of Unocal, had been active in oil shale development since World War II, and it was largely through his forcefulness that Unocal built the Parachute facility. This effectively closed the only commercial shale oil operation in the United States. Fred Hartly, former President and Chairman of the Board of Unocal, had been active in oil shale development since World War II, and it was largely through his forcefulness that Unocal built the Parachute facility. After his retirement and death, the Parachute facility was placed on a break-even or better operation and, when it became unprofitable during the 1990 calendar year, the decision was made to close the operation. Armand Hammer, Chairman of the Board of Occidental Oil Company, strongly believed in the need for the United States to have an alternative liquid-fuel supply source because the demand for transportation fuels was increasing every year from 1978 to 1991. Nearly two-thirds of the worlds crude oil reserves (600 billion barrels) were in the Middle East, and U.S. dependence on the Middle East was increasing every year. Oil shale deposits in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming contain an estimated 800 billion barrels of recoverable shale oil. The problem, of course, is to recover this shale oil at a cost competitive with that of conventional crude oil. Mr. Hammer was optimistic that a modified in situ retorting process could be developed by which shale oil could be produced at a competitive cost. He, with the support of Western Congressional representatives, obtained government support on a matching basis for a long-term research and development program. As long as he was alive, Occidental Oil Company was committed to developing this process, but, upon his death, his successors terminated the operation because they believed that the research development costs of modified in situ processing technology could not be justified under present economic and environmental climate. Today, government and industrial support of a research and development program for Western oil shale is virtually nonexistent. The major oil companies who own oil shale lands and in the past funded oil shale research and development, now have only skeleton staffs of one or two persons working on oil shale topics, and they generally are involved in readying files for long-term storage. At this time, the future of the shale oil industry appears to be in the far distance. In spite of the outlook, the papers presented at this 24th Annual Oil Shale Symposium covered the entire of range of topics and are of excellent quality. Included in the Proceedings is a paper that inadvertently was omitted from the Proceedings of the 23rd Symposium. It is published here to make the record complete and I apologize to M. Ron Cattany for its omission. This Proceedings once again is being published as a Colorado School of Mines Quarterly. During the early years of the symposia, the proceedings were published as Quarterlies, but when the sessions grew to the point that the papers given required more than one Quarterly per year, the Proceedings were published as separate volumes. Now that that number of papers is smaller and the number of attendees is less than 100, publishing the Proceedings once again as a Quarterly will give broader dissemination of the information. The quality of the Symposium would not have been possible without the support of the authors and their employers. The Colorado School of Mines and I wish to express our thanks for their continuing support. - James H. Gary, Director, 24th Annual Oil Shale Symposium.
    • Aerial platform and roof bolter

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      The United States Bureau of Mines facility at Anvil Points, near Rifle, Colorado, was reactivated starting in May 1964 and was operated during 1965, 1966, and 1967. A research and development program was conducted to investigate the technical feasibility of room-and-pillar mining with explosives, crushing and Gas-Combustion Retorting techniques for oil shale. Mobil Oil Corporation acted as Project Manager for the cooperative industry group at Rifle which included Continental Oil Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Phillips Petroleum Company, and Sinclair Research, Inc. as Participating Parties. The runs recorded from the Gas Combustion No. 3 Retort are part of the Technical Memorandum reported to the Technical Advisory Committee. The primary object of the Anvil Points Oil Shale Research Center Technical memorandum is to advise authorized personnel employed by the Participating Parties that various activities are in progress or that certain significant data have been obtained within the Research Center. Costs of the Rifle operation were shared equally by the six participants. Each Participating Party was represented by personnel on the technical staff. The Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. acted as lessor-of-record and supplied nontechnical personnel for administrative and logistic support.
    • Agenda for technical observers meeting, August 24 and 25, 1966

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      Project Manager for the research program is Mobil Oil Corporation, formerly Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc. Other companies participating in the program are Humble Oil and Refining Company, Continental Oil Company, Sinclair Research, Inc., Pan American Petroleum Corporation and Phillips Petroleum Company. Each of these companies shares equally in the cost of the project. In addition, all raw data from the project is submitted to the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Interior under the terms of the contract between Department of the Interior and the Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. Participants in the Technical Observers are Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Sinclair Research, Inc., Sinclair Oil and Gas Company, Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc., Continental Oil Company, Phillips Petroleum Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, and Esso Research and Engineering Company. From the Lease Agreement between the United States of America and Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. of the Anvil Points Experimental and Demonstration Facilities near Rifle, Colorado, Appendix I: 3.01: Confidentiality; Publication states: The Bureau of Mines shall have the right to station observers at the Anvil Points Facilities in reasonable numbers, which observers shall have the right to inspect and observe the work under the Initial Program. The observers shall abide by the safety rules and regulations established for employees at the Anvil Points Facilities, and their activities shall not interfere with operations at the Anvil Points Facilities. To facilitate the Technical Observers they will receive copies of the Monthly Process Memorandum. Technical Observers received general review and alignment of subsequent sessions, corrosion program requirements and scope, engineering and economic analyses, optimum maximum shale size and number of feed fractions, retort studies, crushing studies, shale size-rate studies, Retort No. 2 operability, bench scale studies, future plans, mechanical engineering, analytical laboratory, mining studies, mine development, mining research, mechanical model studies, basic mist flow in piping, design of 100 ton bin, retort shale flow and bayonet length, Stage II rehabilitation, inspection Retort No. 3, and review.
    • Agenda for technical observers meeting, August 24 and 25, 1966

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      Project Manager for the research program is Mobil Oil Corporation, formerly Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc. Other companies participating in the program are Humble Oil and Refining Company, Continental Oil Company, Sinclair Research, Inc., Pan American Petroleum Corporation and Phillips Petroleum Company. Each of these companies shares equally in the cost of the project. In addition, all raw data from the project is submitted to the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Interior under the terms of the contract between Department of the Interior and the Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. Participants in the Technical Observers are Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Sinclair Research, Inc., Sinclair Oil and Gas Company, Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc., Continental Oil Company, Phillips Petroleum Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, and Esso Research and Engineering Company. From the Lease Agreement between the United States of America and Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. of the Anvil Points Experimental and Demonstration Facilities near Rifle, Colorado, Appendix I: 3.01: Confidentiality; Publication states: The Bureau of Mines shall have the right to station observers at the Anvil Points Facilities in reasonable numbers, which observers shall have the right to inspect and observe the work under the Initial Program. The observers shall abide by the safety rules and regulations established for employees at the Anvil Points Facilities, and their activities shall not interfere with operations at the Anvil Points Facilities. To facilitate the Technical Observers they will receive copies of the Monthly Process Memorandum. Technical Observers received general review and alignment of subsequent sessions, corrosion program requirements and scope, engineering and economic analyses, optimum maximum shale size and number of feed fractions, retort studies, crushing studies, shale size-rate studies, Retort No. 2 operability, bench scale studies, future plans, mechanical engineering, analytical laboratory, mining studies, mine development, mining research, mechanical model studies, basic mist flow in piping, design of 100 ton bin, retort shale flow and bayonet length, Stage II rehabilitation, inspection Retort No. 3, and review.
    • Agenda for technical observers meeting, February 21 and 22, 1967

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      Project Manager for the research program is Mobil Oil Corporation, formerly Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc. Other companies participating in the program are Humble Oil and Refining Company, Continental Oil Company, Sinclair Research, Inc., Pan American Petroleum Corporation and Phillips Petroleum Company. Each of these companies shares equally in the cost of the project. In addition, all raw data from the project is submitted to the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Interior under the terms of the contract between Department of the Interior and the Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. Participants in the Technical Observers are Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Sinclair Research, Inc., Sinclair Oil and Gas Company, Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc., Continental Oil Company, Phillips Petroleum Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, and Esso Research and Engineering Company. From the Lease Agreement between the United States of America and Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. of the Anvil Points Experimental and Demonstration Facilities near Rifle, Colorado, Appendix I: 3.01: Confidentiality; Publication states: The Bureau of Mines shall have the right to station observers at the Anvil Points Facilities in reasonable numbers, which observers shall have the right to inspect and observe the work under the Initial Program. The observers shall abide by the safety rules and regulations established for employees at the Anvil Points Facilities, and their activities shall not interfere with operations at the Anvil Points Facilities. To facilitate the Technical Observers they will receive copies of the Monthly Process Memorandum. Technical Observers received general review and alignment of subsequent sessions, corrosion program requirements and scope, engineering and economic analyses, optimum maximum shale size and number of feed fractions, retort studies, crushing studies, shale size-rate studies, Retort No. 2 operability, bench scale studies, future plans, mechanical engineering, analytical laboratory, mining studies, mine development, mining research, mechanical model studies, basic mist flow in piping, design of 100 ton bin, retort shale flow and bayonet length, Stage II rehabilitation, inspection Retort No. 3, and review.
    • Agenda for technical observers meeting, January 4 and 5, 1967

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      Project Manager for the research program is Mobil Oil Corporation, formerly Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc. Other companies participating in the program are Humble Oil and Refining Company, Continental Oil Company, Sinclair Research, Inc., Pan American Petroleum Corporation and Phillips Petroleum Company. Each of these companies shares equally in the cost of the project. In addition, all raw data from the project is submitted to the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Interior under the terms of the contract between Department of the Interior and the Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. Participants in the Technical Observers are Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Sinclair Research, Inc., Sinclair Oil and Gas Company, Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc. , Continental Oil Company, Phillips Petroleum Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, and Esso Research and Engineering Company. From the Lease Agreement between the United States of America and Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. of the Anvil Points Experimental and Demonstration Facilities near Rifle, Colorado, Appendix I: 3.01: Confidentiality; Publication states: The Bureau of Mines shall have the right to station observers at the Anvil Points Facilities in reasonable numbers, which observers shall have the right to inspect and observe the work under the Initial Program. The observers shall abide by the safety rules and regulations established for employees at the Anvil Points Facilities, and their activities shall not interfere with operations at the Anvil Points Facilities. To facilitate the Technical Observers they will receive copies of the Monthly Process Memorandum. Technical Observers received general review and alignment of subsequent sessions, corrosion program requirements and scope, engineering and economic analyses, optimum maximum shale size and number of feed fractions, retort studies, crushing studies, shale size-rate studies, Retort No. 2 operability, bench scale studies, future plans, mechanical engineering, analytical laboratory, mining studies, mine development, mining research, mechanical model studies, basic mist flow in piping, design of 100 ton bin, retort shale flow and bayonet length, Stage II rehabilitation, inspection Retort No. 3, and review.
    • Agenda for technical observers meeting, July 6 and 7, 1967

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      Project Manager for the research program is Mobil Oil Corporation, formerly Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc. Other companies participating in the program are Humble Oil and Refining Company, Continental Oil Company, Sinclair Research, Inc., Pan American Petroleum Corporation and Phillips Petroleum Company. Each of these companies shares equally in the cost of the project. In addition, all raw data from the project is submitted to the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Interior under the terms of the contract between Department of the Interior and the Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. Participants in the Technical Observers are Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Sinclair Research, Inc., Sinclair Oil and Gas Company, Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc., Continental Oil Company, Phillips Petroleum Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, and Esso Research and Engineering Company. From the Lease Agreement between the United States of America and Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. of the Anvil Points Experimental and Demonstration Facilities near Rifle, Colorado, Appendix I: 3.01: Confidentiality; Publication states: The Bureau of Mines shall have the right to station observers at the Anvil Points Facilities in reasonable numbers, which observers shall have the right to inspect and observe the work under the Initial Program. The observers shall abide by the safety rules and regulations established for employees at the Anvil Points Facilities, and their activities shall not interfere with operations at the Anvil Points Facilities. To facilitate the Technical Observers they will receive copies of the Monthly Process Memorandum. Technical Observers received general review and alignment of subsequent sessions, corrosion program requirements and scope, engineering and economic analyses, optimum maximum shale size and number of feed fractions, retort studies, crushing studies, shale size-rate studies, Retort No. 2 operability, bench scale studies, future plans, mechanical engineering, analytical laboratory, mining studies, mine development, mining research, mechanical model studies, basic mist flow in piping, design of 100 ton bin, retort shale flow and bayonet length, Stage II rehabilitation, inspection Retort No. 3, and review.
    • Agenda for technical observers meeting, May 2 and 3, 1967

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      Project Manager for the research program is Mobil Oil Corporation, formerly Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc. Other companies participating in the program are Humble Oil and Refining Company, Continental Oil Company, Sinclair Research, Inc., Pan American Petroleum Corporation and Phillips Petroleum Company. Each of these companies shares equally in the cost of the project. In addition, all raw data from the project is submitted to the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Interior under the terms of the contract between Department of the Interior and the Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. Participants in the Technical Observers are Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Sinclair Research, Inc., Sinclair Oil and Gas Company, Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc., Continental Oil Company, Phillips Petroleum Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, and Esso Research and Engineering Company. From the Lease Agreement between the United States of America and Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. of the Anvil Points Experimental and Demonstration Facilities near Rifle, Colorado, Appendix I: 3.01: Confidentiality; Publication states: The Bureau of Mines shall have the right to station observers at the Anvil Points Facilities in reasonable numbers, which observers shall have the right to inspect and observe the work under the Initial Program. The observers shall abide by the safety rules and regulations established for employees at the Anvil Points Facilities, and their activities shall not interfere with operations at the Anvil Points Facilities. To facilitate the Technical Observers they will receive copies of the Monthly Process Memorandum. Technical Observers received general review and alignment of subsequent sessions, corrosion program requirements and scope, engineering and economic analyses, optimum maximum shale size and number of feed fractions, retort studies, crushing studies, shale size-rate studies, Retort No. 2 operability, bench scale studies, future plans, mechanical engineering, analytical laboratory, mining studies, mine development, mining research, mechanical model studies, basic mist flow in piping, design of 100 ton bin, retort shale flow and bayonet length, Stage II rehabilitation, inspection Retort No. 3, and review.
    • Agreement between Mobil Oil Corporation and Colorado School of Mines, Research Foundation on Mobil's mining program at Anvil Points

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      The United States Bureau of Mines facility at Anvil Points, near Rifle, Colorado, was reactivated starting in May 1964 and was operated during 1965, 1966, and 1967. A research and development program was conducted to investigate the technical feasibility of room-and-pillar mining with explosives, crushing and Gas-Combustion Retorting techniques for oil shale. Mobil Oil Corporation acted as Project Manager for the cooperative industry group at Rifle which included Continental Oil Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Phillips Petroleum Company, and Sinclair Research, Inc. as Participating Parties. The runs recorded from the Gas Combustion No. 3 Retort are part of the Technical Memorandum reported to the Technical Advisory Committee. The primary object of the Anvil Points Oil Shale Research Center Technical memorandum is to advise authorized personnel employed by the Participating Parties that various activities are in progress or that certain significant data have been obtained within the Research Center. Costs of the Rifle operation were shared equally by the six participants. Each Participating Party was represented by personnel on the technical staff. The Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. acted as lessor-of-record and supplied nontechnical personnel for administrative and logistic support.
    • Agreements, relating to Anvil Points experimental and demonstration facilities near Rifle, Colorado

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      The United States Bureau of Mines facility at Anvil Points, near Rifle, Colorado, was reactivated starting in May 1964 and was operated during 1965, 1966, and 1967. A research and development program was conducted to investigate the technical feasibility of room-and-pillar mining with explosives, crushing and Gas-Combustion Retorting techniques for oil shale. Mobil Oil Corporation acted as Project Manager for the cooperative industry group at Rifle which included Continental Oil Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Phillips Petroleum Company, and Sinclair Research, Inc. as Participating Parties. The runs recorded from the Gas Combustion No. 3 Retort are part of the Technical Memorandum reported to the Technical Advisory Committee. The primary object of the Anvil Points Oil Shale Research Center Technical memorandum is to advise authorized personnel employed by the Participating Parties that various activities are in progress or that certain significant data have been obtained within the Research Center. Costs of the Rifle operation were shared equally by the six participants. Each Participating Party was represented by personnel on the technical staff. The Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. acted as lessor-of-record and supplied nontechnical personnel for administrative and logistic support.
    • Allis-Chalmers - double roll tooth crusher hardfacing study

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      The United States Bureau of Mines facility at Anvil Points, near Rifle, Colorado, was reactivated starting in May 1964 and was operated during 1965, 1966, and 1967. A research and development program was conducted to investigate the technical feasibility of room-and-pillar mining with explosives, crushing and Gas-Combustion Retorting techniques for oil shale. Mobil Oil Corporation acted as Project Manager for the cooperative industry group at Rifle which included Continental Oil Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Phillips Petroleum Company, and Sinclair Research, Inc. as Participating Parties. The runs recorded from the Gas Combustion No. 3 Retort are part of the Technical Memorandum reported to the Technical Advisory Committee. The primary object of the Anvil Points Oil Shale Research Center Technical memorandum is to advise authorized personnel employed by the Participating Parties that various activities are in progress or that certain significant data have been obtained within the Research Center. Costs of the Rifle operation were shared equally by the six participants. Each Participating Party was represented by personnel on the technical staff. The Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. acted as lessor-of-record and supplied nontechnical personnel for administrative and logistic support.
    • American Mining Congress, Cleveland, Ohio, National Oil Shale Conference

      Alderson, Victor C.; Colorado School of Mines
      Verbatim report of sessions held at the National Oil Shale Conference in Cleveland Ohio, including presentations.
    • Analysis of oil shale crushing tests in large-scale equipment, An

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      The United States Bureau of Mines facility at Anvil Points, near Rifle, Colorado, was reactivated starting in May 1964 and was operated during 1965, 1966, and 1967. A research and development program was conducted to investigate the technical feasibility of room-and-pillar mining with explosives, crushing and Gas-Combustion Retorting techniques for oil shale. Mobil Oil Corporation acted as Project Manager for the cooperative industry group at Rifle, Colorado which included Continental Oil Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Phillips Petroleum Company, and Sinclair Research, Inc. as Participating Parties. This document represents a final report of research by authorized personnel employed by the Participating Parties. The various activities are in progress or show that certain significant data have been obtained within the Research Center. Costs of the Rifle operation were shared equally by the six participants. Each Participating Party was re presented by personnel on the technical staff. The Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. acted as lessor-of-record and supplied nontechnical personnel for administrative and logistic support.
    • Analysis of the effects of process variables during operation of the gas-combustion retort, An

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      The United States Bureau of Mines facility at Anvil Points, near Rifle, Colorado, was reactivated starting in May 1964 and was operated during 1965, 1966, and 1967. A research and development program was conducted to investigate the technical feasibility of room-and-pillar mining with explosives, crushing and Gas-Combustion Retorting techniques for oil shale. Mobil Oil Corporation acted as Project Manager for the cooperative industry group at Rifle which included Continental Oil Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Phillips Petroleum Company, and Sinclair Research, Inc. as Participating Parties. The runs recorded from the Gas Combustion No. 3 Retort are part of the Technical Memorandum reported to the Technical Advisory Committee. The primary object of the Anvil Points Oil Shale Research Center Technical memorandum is to advise authorized personnel employed by the Participating Parties that various activities are in progress or that certain significant data have been obtained within the Research Center. Costs of the Rifle operation were shared equally by the six participants. Each Participating Party was represented by personnel on the technical staff. The Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. acted as lessor-of-record and supplied nontechnical personnel for administrative and logistic support.
    • Analytical laboratory methods

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      The United States Bureau of Mines facility at Anvil Points, near Rifle, Colorado, was reactivated starting in May 1964 and was operated during 1965, 1966, and 1967. A research and development program was conducted to investigate the technical feasibility of room-and-pillar mining with explosives, crushing and Gas-Combustion Retorting techniques for oil shale. Mobil Oil Corporation acted as Project Manager for the cooperative industry group at Rifle which included Continental Oil Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Phillips Petroleum Company, and Sinclair Research, Inc. as Participating Parties. The runs recorded from the Gas Combustion No. 3 Retort are part of the Technical Memorandum reported to the Technical Advisory Committee. The primary object of the Anvil Points Oil Shale Research Center Technical memorandum is to advise authorized personnel employed by the Participating Parties that various activities are in progress or that certain significant data have been obtained within the Research Center. Costs of the Rifle operation were shared equally by the six participants. Each Participating Party was represented by personnel on the technical staff. The Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. acted as lessor-of-record and supplied nontechnical personnel for administrative and logistic support.
    • Analytical laboratory methods (final revision)

      Mobil Oil Corporation
      The United States Bureau of Mines facility at Anvil Points, near Rifle, Colorado, was reactivated starting in May 1964 and was operated during 1965, 1966, and 1967. A research and development program was conducted to investigate the technical feasibility of room-and-pillar mining with explosives, crushing and Gas-Combustion Retorting techniques for oil shale. Mobil Oil Corporation acted as Project Manager for the cooperative industry group at Rifle which included Continental Oil Company, Humble Oil and Refining Company, Pan American Petroleum Corporation, Phillips Petroleum Company, and Sinclair Research, Inc. as Participating Parties. Costs of the Rifle operation were shared equally by the six participants. Each Participating Party was represented by personnel on the technical staff. The Colorado School of Mines Research Foundation, Inc. acted as lessor-of-record and supplied nontechnical personnel for administrative and logistic support.