• Under cover items of interest in the Information Center for Ropeway Studies Collection

      Roslund, Sid; International Organization for Transportation by Rope; North American Continental Section 200 : Lakewood, Colo. (North American Continental Section)
      Presently the Information Center for Ropeway Studies Collection has over 800 books on diferent aspects of ropeways systems. There are the usual books such as CF&I Roebling Wire Rope Handbook or Aerial Tramways and Funicular Railways by Z. Schneigert. One collection of books from Casper D. Meals is a unique compendium of varied materials (papers, journal articles, manufacturers catalogues, etc.) that were bound into books during the first decades of the 20th Century. The binding of the printed materials into books captured a "snapshot" of the wire rope industry for a short time period in each book. This paper will look at several of the information threads that weave through these books and several other book series in the Collection.
    • Common law of the European community and its influence on running cable cars, The

      Thony, Walther; International Organization for the Study of Transportation by Rope; Internationaler Seilbahnkongress 1999: San Francisco, Calif.
      Congress paper discusses European common law, regulations, economic considerations and the EURO as they influence ropeway manufacturers, installation and operation. (CFD).
    • Advanced funicular technology

      Hofmann, Gottfried; International Organization for the Study of Transportation by Rope; Internationaler Seilbahnkongress 1999: San Francisco, Calif.
      Congress paper traces evolution of funicular technology from 1804 to date. Funicular operating systems are compared. Component design considered on individual basis. State of the art summary considers safety, automation, ergonomics, acoustics, capacity and cost. Illustrative drawings, graphs and photographs. (CFD).
    • Medellin project in Colombia, The

      Adrien, Philippe; International Organization for Transportation by Rope; North American Continental Section 2004: Vail, Colo. (North American Continental Section)
      The municipal council of Medellin has chosen the gondola lift solution to connect the hillside district of Santo Domingo to the city's overground metro network. The MetroCable project, as it is called, is jointly funded by the city and the mass transit company, Metro Medellin. The system is an Ariana 8-10 gondola lift from the Satellit range, equipped with aluminum Diamond gondolas made by Sigma. The line is scheduled to run 18 hours/day, all year round. It is 2 km. long, with a vertical rise of 400 meters, three sections and four terminals, including two intermediate stations, the first of which includes a 15° turn. Ground on which the lift is built calls for extremely deep anchoring for the single-shaft towers, each of which rests on four piles, with a diameter of 2 m. driven down to a depth of 8 meters.
    • Lifts without a tensioning device

      Marocchi, Andrea; International Organization for the Study of Transportation by Rope; Internationaler Seilbahnkongress 1999: San Francisco, Calif.
      In Barcelona I spoke about the work I had been doing with the Polytechnic di Torino on the tensioning devices; afterwards, the theoretical work was developed and we made a series of tests with a device able to measure the tension of the rope in the drive station of a moving 12-passenger gondola lift. As further development, I am proposing now a series of cases where a circulating lift can work in a simpler and safer way without a tensioning device, often without any increase in the rope diameter. One of the reasons why the classic circulating-multi-tower lifts had a tensioning device was the line calculation: years ago it was quite impossible to perform such a calculation by hand! Now we have good and affordable computer programs that can solve this problem: these programs make possible to build lifts without tensioning device when it can be useful, or to use an intelligent variable-tension device, if this solution offers advantages. We need some norms for these new designs, so I suggest some issues emerging from the test calculations, which I did on lift lines with no tensioning device. In many countries, the approval of new concepts lift design by the Surveying Authorities needs Norms. A big obstacle in developing Norms and methods of calculation is the lack of experiments and the high cost of them; I propose a new approach to the experiments on the rope configuration, using a mixture of model testing and computer simulation. The computer simulation is calibrated using a model of lift that can be configured in many different ways; this low-cost model is built using standard materials and it is really easy to take measures and data.
    • Marquam Hill aerial tramway, The: a connection to Portland's future

      Gmuender, Joe C.; International Organization for Transportation by Rope. North American Continental Section
      The politically charged Marquam Hill Tramway is designed to connect Portland's largest employer, the landlocked Oregon Health Sciences University, with 120 acres of underused, industrial land at the edge of the Willamette River. Logistical challenges associated with the alignment and the construction of the tram as it passes over a national historic district and fits into the existing footprints of existing structures are just part of the unique issues of this public transportation link project.
    • Motions and forces in the rope system of aerial ropeways during operation

      Liedl, Stephan; International Organization for the Study of Transportation by Rope; Internationaler Seilbahnkongress 1999: San Francisco, Calif.
      Congress paper presents a unique overview of motions and forces involving the rope system of modern ropeways during operation. The basic method developed for calculations is not suitable for detailed dynamic analyses. Descriptive drawings and graphs. (CFD).
    • Micro piles as a favorable foundation alternative in ropeway-engineering

      Brandner, Andreas; International Organization for the Study of Transportation by Rope; Internationaler Seilbahnkongress 1999: San Francisco, Calif.
      Congress paper details advantages of using micropiles in foundations for ropeway structure foundations. Environmental and cost-saving considerations are primary. Engineering calculations.
    • Amusement transportation by wire rope

      Doman, D. Mark; International Organization for Transportation by Rope. North American Continental Section
      There are significant parallels and commonalities between the ski and amusement industries and passenger transportation by wire rope goes back at least as far in amusement settings as it does in skiing. Every major amusement park has a "Sky Ride" made by one of the same suppliers that supply the ski industry, but the amusement industry uses wire rope to solve passenger transportation problems in some unique and interesting ways. The original way that the amusement industry used to turn large passenger carrying structures at slow speeds from high speed output shafts was with wire ropes. The obvious example is the Ferris Wheel but early drive mechanisms for many common amusement rides used wire ropes. "Pinch wheel" drives, like the drives used to propel detachable carriers in terminal conveyors, have replaced the old wire rope drives in the amusement industry, but new rides use wire ropes to do new and remarkable things. The tension resulting from the mass per length of roller lift chains limits conventional roller coaster heights to approximately two hundred feet. Using wire ropes however, roller coaster manufacturers have been able to build coasters more than 450 feet tall and to launch their trains at over 125 mph. One solution uses an approach similar to a jig-back tram where what would be the tram car latches to a roller coaster train and hauls it up the 300 feet lift hill at detachable lift speeds using 800 hp. Another approach accumulates energy in a bank of hydraulic accumulators and releases it to accelerate a 15,000 pound train to 125 mph in two seconds - enough energy for the train to summit a 450 foot hill. This approach uses rotation resistant rope and water cooling.
    • Economic significance of cableways illustrated by the example of Titlis Rotair in Engelberg, near to Lucerne, Switzerland

      Ruegger, Eugenio; International Organization for the Study of Transportation by Rope; Internationaler Seilbahnkongress 1999: San Francisco, Calif.
      Congress paper studies economics of ropeway operations in alpine areas. The Engelberg Tourist Resort is used as an example. Ropeways are considered the backbone of alpine tourism. (CFD).
    • Maintenance system for safe operation of out-dated aerial ropeways

      Jarec, Bojan; International Organization for the Study of Transportation by Rope; Internationaler Seilbahnkongress 1999: San Francisco, Calif.
      Congress paper discusses maintenance systems used to assure safe operation of out-dated passenger ropeways operating in Slovenia. Graphs. (CFD).
    • Importance of ropeways in urban transportation, The

      Baumann, Peter; International Organization for Transportation by Rope. North American Continental Section
      Urban transportation has so far made little use of the many advantages of ropeways, despite the fact that already in the 1980's a number of conferences were held in order to promote such systems. What are the reasons for the so far modest success of all these efforts? In this paper we will try to demonstrate the main reasons, such as lack of information and know-how in the heads of urban planners, the lack of information and incorporation in the respective education at universities, the amusement type image of the systems as well as the fact, that the systems have made an tremendous development in the last 15 years in terms of travel speed and capacities. Some very positive examples of the use of ropeways in urban transportation will be shown, examples of Aerial Tramways, Funiculars, Cable Liners, 3S-Systems and Monocable Gondolas. A special focus will be pointed at the integration of ropeways into other modes of transport. Instead of the question being asked "Ropeway or another form of transport", the discussion should be about integrated systems. Here we see the big potential of ropeways. At last we will show the CO2 - Emissions from Ropeways compared to convential busses.
    • Loading conveyors for chairlifts

      Russell, Maynard; International Organization for Transportation by Rope. North American Continental Section
      Chairlift loading conveyors are becoming commonplace around the world. This paper historically reviews the first conveyors marketed and discusses the current products available for both fixed grip and detachable lifts. The North American market is just beginning to utilize this technology and this paper explains various options available today. With the price of new lifts relatively high perhaps a loading conveyor is a solution for increasing your lifts' capacity. This paper dispels some of the myths and gives actual statistics for improved performance of your lifts. All of the various components from foundations to the control gates are discussed. There is also a discussion of unloading carpets and their current applications. ANSI B77.1 is currently considering including both loading and unloading carpets in a separate section of the Standard.
    • Trends in the world market for winter sports: what will the resorts of the 21st century look like?

      Guilpart, Eric; International Organization for the Study of Transportation by Rope; Internationaler Seilbahnkongress 1999: San Francisco, Calif.
      Congress paper details history to date, present status and prediction for future ski area development. Emphasis on changing economic and ecological, considerations, and participant preferences. Conclusions are drawn to the "Ski Equation." (CFD).
    • Importance of track rope slipping on tramway systems, The

      Blomer, Red; International Organization for Transportation by Rope. North American Continental Section
      In most cases the tramway manufacture requires track rope slipping every twelve (12) years. Operators may ask why or wonder what will be gained by this process; this paper will provide insight to what has been found in the last round of track rope slipping in over a dozen tram systems in North America between 2005 and 2009. Critical areas of concern: final end attachments, bollard wood, broken wires, lubrication, vibration, contact with concrete, bronze profile and corrosion.
    • Development of passenger cabins, The

      Wehrli, Rico; International Organization for Transportation by Rope. North American Continental Section
      The development of rope- and rail-bounded vehicles since the 50's. Development of these vehicles is pointed out from different points of view, among other things: Design, construction, regulations, comfort, etc.
    • Ski areas and environment

      Manhart, Michael; International Organization for the Study of Transportation by Rope; Internationaler Seilbahnkongress 1999: San Francisco, Calif.
      Congress paper stresses importance of environmental considerations in all aspects of ski area management. Illustrative photographs. (CFD).
    • Birth of the cable car, The

      Okreglak, Les M.; International Organization for the Study of Transportation by Rope; Internationaler Seilbahnkongress 1999: San Francisco, Calif.
      Congress paper covers technical considerations involved in design and operation of the historical San Francisco cable car system. Challenges of the modern system are included. Illustrative drawings and photographs. (CFD).
    • Holistic view of ropeways and the environment: the impact of ropeways on their natural surroundings, A

      Hinteregger, Christoph; International Organization for the Study of Transportation by Rope; Internationaler Seilbahnkongress 1999: San Francisco, Calif.
      Congress paper discusses the economic and environmental considerations associated with ropeway operation, particularly in mountain areas. Fully illustrated with drawings and photographs. (CFD).
    • Workable tourists cablecar equation in emerging East

      Chakravarty, Shekhar; International Organization for the Study of Transportation by Rope; Internationaler Seilbahnkongress 1999: San Francisco, Calif.
      Congress paper studies economic feasibility of passenger ropeways to solve transport problems in emerging east, Asia and the Indian subcontinent. Facility costs, tariffs and incomes are compared with Europe and North America. Aerial Ropeway Development Corporation is formed and OITAF assistance is proposed. (CFD).