• Abacus

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions
      The abacus, also called a counting frame, is a calculating tool used primarily in parts of Asia for performing arithmetic processes. Today, abaci are often constructed as a bamboo frame with beads sliding on wires, but originally they were beans or stones moving in grooves in sand or on tablets of wood, stone, or metal. The abacus was in use centuries before the adoption of the written modern numerical system. It is still widely used by merchants, traders, and clerks in Asia, Africa, and elsewhere. The user of an abacus is called an abacist.
    • Apple Computer Corporation desktop iMac

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Apple
      Marketed with a stylish design this desktop computer was intended to attract everyday users. It featured a 233 MHz processor, 32 MB of RAM, a 4 GB hard drive, a 24x CD-ROM, stereo speakers, and a 15-inch multiscan monitor.
    • Apple Newton MessagePad 110

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Apple
      Earlier models of the MessagePad were not well received due to the poor battery life and variable quality of the built-in hardwriting recognition. The Model 110, represented here, ran on 4 AA batteries, and included much improved software, not only for the handwriting recognition, but also inter device communications. Originally intended to "reinvent" personal computing, the hardware and Newton OS fell prey to fears that it would cut into Macintosh sales, so was "reinvented" as a PDA, or Personal Digital Assistant. It was then marketed as an accessory to the Macintosh, not a replacement for it. Although not the first device of this type (the Psion Organizer was marketed in 1984), the Apple President John Sculley. In a CNET interview, Sculley estimated that the Newton project cost US $100 million to develop and market.
    • Colby Systems Corporation Walkmac

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; The Colby Systems
      The Colby Systems Walkmac SE-30 is essentially the Macintosh SE/30 repackaged in a portable 16-pound case. It features a 9-inch backlit LCD screen, 20 or 40 MB hard drive disk, 16 MHz processor, and 256 KB of RAM. This was a quite expensive alternative to a desktop Mac. Today's price would be $11,300.
    • Compucorp 322G Scientist

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Compucorp
      This programmable calculator holds one program up to 80 steps and is precise up to 13 digits. It operates using both algebraic and Trigonometric functions and was originally marketed as having a "groovy" orange plasma flourescent display. Cost was $795.00. In 2011 dollars, this would cost $4,140.
    • Cross Crosspad XP

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Cross Company
      The Cross Company co-developed the Crosspad XP with IBM. It was created as an addition to the newly developed category of Portable Digital Notepads pioneered by the Cross Company. The Crosspad XP allowed users to write in ink on a standard notepad, while simultaneously creating a digital copy of the notes. These digital notes can then be uploaded to a PC and stored, organized, and shared.
    • Floppy disk storage

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions
      A floppy disk is made up of a thin piece of magnetic media sealed in a square or rectangular plastic carrier. Capacities varied from 180 KB to 1.44 MB. Contrary to logic, the capacity increased as the size decreased. Floppy disks were invented by IBM and were the most popular form of data storage and exchange during the 80s and 90s. Eventually, file and program sizes exceeded the floppy's capacity, and they were replaced with CDs, USB keys, and other removable media. The most popular sizes were the 8 inch, 5 1/4 inch, and finally the 3 1/2 inch.
    • Gateway 2000 Colorbook

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Gateway
      Introduced as a follow-up to the Gateway Handbook (1992), the Gateway 2000 Colorbook exhibits an Intel 804865SX at 25Mhz, RAM capacity offered in 4, 8, 12, 20 MB, 80 MB hard disk drive, and featured 256 different colors. The relative worth of $1,995.00 from 1994 is: $2,940.00 using the Consumer Price Index.
    • General ceramics ferrite core memory

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions
      Magnetic-core memory is an early form of random-access computer memory. It uses tiny magnetic rings, the cores, through which wires are threaded to write and read information. Each core represents one bit of information. The cores can be magnetically polarized in two different ways and that bit stored in a core is zero or one depending on that core's polarity. The wires are arranged to allow an individual core to be set to either polarity, and for its polarity to be sensed, by sending appropriate current pulses through selected wires. This represents 100 bits, and was originally contracted for use in early IBM computers.
    • Hard disk drive (destroyed)

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions
      Hard disk drives are non-volatile, random access devices for digital data. They are comprised of rotating rigid plates or motor-driven spindle within a protective enclosure. An example of a complete hard disk drive is nearby. Because destruction of data on hard disk drives is largely ineffective by merely overwriting the data, they must be shredded before recycling. This is what is left after shredding. Mines periodically shreds old drives to ensure data security and privacy.
    • HP thermal printer 82162A

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Hewlett-Packard Company
      An accessory to the programmable calculators, this HP thermal printer prints on command and can be used to trace work and program execution. The HP thermal printer 82162A also features both printing and plotting functions. These still sell on ebay for up to $100 and up.
    • HP-41CV

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Hewlett-Packard Company
      The HP41C series programmable calculators offered the first alphanumeric capabilities and featured ports for memory expansion. The HP-41CV calculator offered 4 ports for memory expansion and ultimately provided 5 times the memory of the first HP-41C model.
    • HP-55

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Hewlett-Packard Company
      The HP-55 programmable calculator came out a year after the HP-67 for a much lower price. It only had 49 lines of program memory (as compared to the HP-67's 224 lines). It did however offer twice as many storage registers, more pre-programmed functions, and a quartz-controlled timer. Today's price (2011) adjusted for inflation, would still be formidable $1,420.
    • HP-67

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Hewlett-Packard Company
      Described as "a major leap forward in fully-programmable personal calculators, the HP-67 is the most powerful personal calculators HP has ever made." Features include: fully merged keycodes, more memory (224 merged program steps and 26 memories), program merging, subroutine nesting, etc. Adjusted for inflation, its $450 price in 1976 equates to $1,720 2011 dollars.
    • HP-75C

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Hewlett-Packard Company
      The HP-75C was HP's first portable computer. It ran BASIC and came with 16K of RAM with an expansion port for additional RAM and 48K of ROM with 3 ROM expansion ports. Adjusted for inflation using the consumer price Index, it would have cost $2,250 in 2011 dollars.
    • IBM Port-A-Punch

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; IBM
      IBM's Supplies Division introduced the Port-A-Punch in 1958 as a fast accurate means of manually punching holes in specially scored IBM punched cards. Designed to fit in the pocket, Port-A-Punch made it possible to create punched card documents anywhere. The product was intended for "on-the-spot" recording operations -- such as physical inventories, job tickets and statistical surveys -- because it eliminated the need for preliminary writing or typing of source documents.
    • Intel 80386 processor

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Intel
      Also known as the i386, this was a 32 bit processor chip introduced by Intel in 1985. The first versions had 275,000 transistors and were used as the central processing unit (CPU) of many workstations and high end personal computers of the time. As the original implementation of 32-bit extension of the 8086 architecture, the 80386 instruction set, programming model, and binary encoding are still the common denominator for all 32-bit x86 processors. The first PC to make use of the 80386 was designed and manufactured by Compaq Computer. This was the first time an x86 innovation was introduced by a company other than IBM.
    • Iomega zip 100

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Iomega
      The Iomega Zip 100 is designed for PCs, and provides 100 MB of parallel port external storage. This allows for 100 MB of data to be transported on removable media and uses a disk resembling a thicker floppy disk. Its popularity was relatively short-lived as it was soon replaced by inexpensive CD writers.
    • Magnetic tape

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions
      Magnetic tape, first used for data storage on the UNIVAC I computer in 1951, was the de facto standard used for large computer systems through the 1980s. The large 8-inch open reels were gradually replaced with cartridge tape systems. The major advantage of tape was its relatively low cost and the fact that the media could be swapped, for virtually unlimited amount of storage. The main disadvantage is that tape is a serial access media, slowing access to any individual bit of data. Tape can still be a viable storage media for large systems. As of 2011, the highest capacity tape cartridges can store up to 5TB of data.
    • MITS Altair convention

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; American Electronics Company
      Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems (MITS) was an American electronics company founded in 1969 by Ed Roberts and Forrest Mims. The company began manufacturing electronic calculators in 1971 and personal computers in 1975. The MITS First (and only) World Altair Computer Convention was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and boasted 700 people from 46 states and seven countries in attendance. MITS featured the Altair 800 operating with the BASIC programming language, now considered to be the first true personal computer. In 1975, two fellows named Bill Gates and Paul Allen developed an interpreter for BASIC, which they marketed as Altair BASIC, followed by the founding of a little company called "Micro-Soft".