• Apple Newton MessagePad 110

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Apple
      Earlier models of the MessagePad were not well received due to the poor battery life and variable quality of the built-in hardwriting recognition. The Model 110, represented here, ran on 4 AA batteries, and included much improved software, not only for the handwriting recognition, but also inter device communications. Originally intended to "reinvent" personal computing, the hardware and Newton OS fell prey to fears that it would cut into Macintosh sales, so was "reinvented" as a PDA, or Personal Digital Assistant. It was then marketed as an accessory to the Macintosh, not a replacement for it. Although not the first device of this type (the Psion Organizer was marketed in 1984), the Apple President John Sculley. In a CNET interview, Sculley estimated that the Newton project cost US $100 million to develop and market.
    • Osborne 1

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Osborne Computer Corporation
      The Osborne Computer Corporation was founded in 1980 with an emphasis placed on portable computers. The Osborne 1 debuted a year later and became the first commercially successful portable microcomputer, featuring a 5-inch (127 mm) 52-column display, two floppy-disk drives, a Z80 microprocessor, and 64KB of RAM. The Osborne 1 ran the then-popular CP/M 2.2 operating system. The computer was shipped with a large bundle of software that was almost equivalent in value to the machine itself, a practice adopted by other CP/M computer vendors. In 2011 dollars, $1,795 = $4,300.
    • General ceramics ferrite core memory

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions
      Magnetic-core memory is an early form of random-access computer memory. It uses tiny magnetic rings, the cores, through which wires are threaded to write and read information. Each core represents one bit of information. The cores can be magnetically polarized in two different ways and that bit stored in a core is zero or one depending on that core's polarity. The wires are arranged to allow an individual core to be set to either polarity, and for its polarity to be sensed, by sending appropriate current pulses through selected wires. This represents 100 bits, and was originally contracted for use in early IBM computers.
    • IBM Port-A-Punch

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; IBM
      IBM's Supplies Division introduced the Port-A-Punch in 1958 as a fast accurate means of manually punching holes in specially scored IBM punched cards. Designed to fit in the pocket, Port-A-Punch made it possible to create punched card documents anywhere. The product was intended for "on-the-spot" recording operations -- such as physical inventories, job tickets and statistical surveys -- because it eliminated the need for preliminary writing or typing of source documents.
    • Gateway 2000 Colorbook

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Gateway
      Introduced as a follow-up to the Gateway Handbook (1992), the Gateway 2000 Colorbook exhibits an Intel 804865SX at 25Mhz, RAM capacity offered in 4, 8, 12, 20 MB, 80 MB hard disk drive, and featured 256 different colors. The relative worth of $1,995.00 from 1994 is: $2,940.00 using the Consumer Price Index.
    • Compucorp 322G Scientist

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Compucorp
      This programmable calculator holds one program up to 80 steps and is precise up to 13 digits. It operates using both algebraic and Trigonometric functions and was originally marketed as having a "groovy" orange plasma flourescent display. Cost was $795.00. In 2011 dollars, this would cost $4,140.
    • TI-Compact Computer 40

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Texas Instruments
      Texas Instruments (TI), once the world's largest semiconductor manufacturer, introduced the Compact Computer 40 (CC-40) in 1983. The CC-40 was very 'cute', and TI's first entry into the portable computer market. The Hex-Bus interface allows external devices to be attached, like Hex-Bus printers, modems, and an expansion interface.
    • HP thermal printer 82162A

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Hewlett-Packard Company
      An accessory to the programmable calculators, this HP thermal printer prints on command and can be used to trace work and program execution. The HP thermal printer 82162A also features both printing and plotting functions. These still sell on ebay for up to $100 and up.
    • HP-41CV

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Hewlett-Packard Company
      The HP41C series programmable calculators offered the first alphanumeric capabilities and featured ports for memory expansion. The HP-41CV calculator offered 4 ports for memory expansion and ultimately provided 5 times the memory of the first HP-41C model.
    • Intel 80386 processor

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Intel
      Also known as the i386, this was a 32 bit processor chip introduced by Intel in 1985. The first versions had 275,000 transistors and were used as the central processing unit (CPU) of many workstations and high end personal computers of the time. As the original implementation of 32-bit extension of the 8086 architecture, the 80386 instruction set, programming model, and binary encoding are still the common denominator for all 32-bit x86 processors. The first PC to make use of the 80386 was designed and manufactured by Compaq Computer. This was the first time an x86 innovation was introduced by a company other than IBM.
    • Hard disk drive (destroyed)

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions
      Hard disk drives are non-volatile, random access devices for digital data. They are comprised of rotating rigid plates or motor-driven spindle within a protective enclosure. An example of a complete hard disk drive is nearby. Because destruction of data on hard disk drives is largely ineffective by merely overwriting the data, they must be shredded before recycling. This is what is left after shredding. Mines periodically shreds old drives to ensure data security and privacy.
    • Punched paper tape

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions
      In 1846, Alexander Bain (the inventor of the electric clock) was the first to use punched tape to send telegrams. Paper tapes are now a largely obsolete form of data storage, must like the punch cards consisting of systematic hole punches within rows and columns. These hole punches created the annoying problem of disposing of paper "chads" and the incomplete punching of holes also posed problems for data interpretation. These so-called "hanging-chads" were the subject of the highly contentious 2000 U.S. Presidential race with incompletely punched voting ballots.
    • Colby Systems Corporation Walkmac

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; The Colby Systems
      The Colby Systems Walkmac SE-30 is essentially the Macintosh SE/30 repackaged in a portable 16-pound case. It features a 9-inch backlit LCD screen, 20 or 40 MB hard drive disk, 16 MHz processor, and 256 KB of RAM. This was a quite expensive alternative to a desktop Mac. Today's price would be $11,300.
    • Victor automatic mechanical calculator

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Victor Company
      This object is in the "streamlined" Art Deco style. This object has a roll of 2 1/4-inch printing paper installed. "Automatic Calculator" is embossed/printed on the chrome escutcheon that surrounds the printing area and paper path. The Victor Company of Chicago, Illinois, is the leading U.S. manufacturer of printing calculators and has been in business since 1918.
    • Sharp Mobilon Tripad

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Sharp
      The Sharp Mobilon Tripad PV-6000 is a handheld computer featuring 16 MB of RAM and upgradeable ROM. It allowed the user to surf the internet while on the go and had 16 hour lithium ion battery life, LCD touch screen display and backlight, and came included with Microsoft Windows CE V2.2 Handheld PC Professional Edition.
    • HP-67

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Hewlett-Packard Company
      Described as "a major leap forward in fully-programmable personal calculators, the HP-67 is the most powerful personal calculators HP has ever made." Features include: fully merged keycodes, more memory (224 merged program steps and 26 memories), program merging, subroutine nesting, etc. Adjusted for inflation, its $450 price in 1976 equates to $1,720 2011 dollars.
    • Iomega zip 100

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Iomega
      The Iomega Zip 100 is designed for PCs, and provides 100 MB of parallel port external storage. This allows for 100 MB of data to be transported on removable media and uses a disk resembling a thicker floppy disk. Its popularity was relatively short-lived as it was soon replaced by inexpensive CD writers.
    • Monroematic CSA-10

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions; Monroematic
      The mechanical calculator features three Registers on the carriage with keys to enter numbers into (or clear) the appropriate register. It had a negative (but no positive) multiply button and a great many other buttons and switches.
    • Magnetic tape

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions
      Magnetic tape, first used for data storage on the UNIVAC I computer in 1951, was the de facto standard used for large computer systems through the 1980s. The large 8-inch open reels were gradually replaced with cartridge tape systems. The major advantage of tape was its relatively low cost and the fact that the media could be swapped, for virtually unlimited amount of storage. The main disadvantage is that tape is a serial access media, slowing access to any individual bit of data. Tape can still be a viable storage media for large systems. As of 2011, the highest capacity tape cartridges can store up to 5TB of data.
    • Thacher's calculating instrument

      Colorado School of Mines. Information & Technology Solutions
      Invented by Edwin Thacher, an American bridge engineer. Patented in 1881, production of this 20-scale cylindrical slide rule was assumed by Keuffel and Esser Co. of New York by 1897. This unit dates to approximately 1920, serial #3499. The 20 scales provide an effective length of 30 feet with an accuracy of 4 to 5 digits. Scales for square roots are also included.