Now showing items 81-100 of 411

    • Engineering geology report for planning districts 7 and 13, state of Colorado

      F.M. Fox & Associates (Colorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes LibraryColorado Geological Survey. Department of Natural Resources, 1974)
      This report was originally prepared for Planning District 7 which has since been divided into two planning districts, 7 and 13. The purpose of this report is to present the results of a comprehensive investigation of the geology and engineering geology of Planning Districts 7 and 13. Planning Districts 7 & 13 include the counties of Lake, Chaffee, Fremont, Custer, Pueblo, Huerfano and Las Animas. Within the Planning Districts, specific geologic factors which should be considered to insure safe, efficient and environmentally sound land use decisions. This investigation was done on a reconnaissance basis and the factors include, but are not limited to, the following: a. Mineral resources which affect land use decisions; b. Massive land movements or other unstable surface conditions; c. Areas of swelling soils, settling soils or other soil factors that will affect foundation construction; d. General areas of flood danger and/or erosional hazards; e. Areas of high water table, both permanent and seasonal; f. General geologic constraints that will affect selection and operation of solid waste disposal sites; g. Pollution potential and other possible hazards associated with old mine tailing dumps; h. Other critical factors which may become evident during the course of the study. The report identified six problem areas in Planning District 7. Problem area I is the Leadville mining district in northeastern Lake County. Problem area II is the Spanish Peaks region with the associated radial dike swarms. Problem area III covers disseminated areas of potential avalanches. Such areas are common in alpine regions, which includes the Sangre de Cristo Range, the Wet Mountains, the Mosquito Range and the Sawatch Range. Problem area IV encompasses areas that were covered by glaciers in the past. Glaciers have covered most of the high mountain ranges, including the Sangre de Cristo Range, the Mosquito Range, and the Sawatch Range. Problem area V includes areas of extremely complex geology. There are several located in the major mountain ranges, including the Mosquito, Sangre de Cristo, Sawatch, and Wet Mountain Ranges. Problem Area VI includes groundwater in Pueblo County, areas of which may be contaminated significantly by radioactive material. Specifics of these problem areas are provided in the report.
    • Geologic aspects, soils and related foundation problems, Denver metropolitan area, Colorado

      Hamilton, Judith L.; Owens, W. G. (Colorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes LibraryColorado Geological Survey. Department of Natural Resources, 1972)
      The purpose of the study was to provide a non-technical summary of the soils and related geologic problems in the Denver Metropolitan area. Data from published and unpublished sources have been synthesized and incorporated into this report in a form that can be used by the general public, planners, engineers, architects, contractors, governmental agencies, and land developers. The study area includes approximately 500 square miles in Township 2 South through Township 5 South and Range 67 West through those portions of Ranges 69 West and 70 West of the 6th P.M. which lie east of the Dakota sandstone hogback. The geologic and soils conditions of the Denver area tend to create several difficulties in construction. The major soil problems are: swelling soils, settling soils, and potential landslide areas. Soils developed from swelling clays or clay shales increase in volume on exposure to moisture and often cause cracking of sidewalks, streets and building foundations. Common methods of treatment of these soils to prevent swelling are provided.
    • Africa's energy transition & critical minerals

      McKennie, Caitlin; Hassan, Al Hassan; Abanga Abugnaba, Mama Nissi; Colorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy (Colorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes LibraryColorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy, 2022-11-03)
      As the energy crisis perseveres and governments around the world attempt to meet net zero emission timelines, there are many eyes on Africa's natural resource supply. Africa is resource rich. The continent is endowed with significant hydrocarbon reserves and critical minerals required for low-carbon technologies. As political and environmental developments around the world seek to decarbonize supply chains, pivoting investments over time towards critical minerals in Africa can help and bridge the gap between emerging/developing economies and energy security.
    • The keys to the future oil and gas production facility: the Colorado story

      Crompton, James; Lindsey, Wyatt; Cheng Siew, Chiang; Colorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy (Colorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes LibraryColorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy, 2022-10-26)
      With growing concern about climate change, the need for a diversified energy portfolio for energy security and the expectation for an energy transition away from fossil fuels to non-carbon energy solutions, such as renewables, all signals suggest that the energy transition has already begun. States like Colorado have been rewriting regulations to include stricter rules on oil and gas production. While the energy industry is transitioning due to market forces, public policies, and technological advances, fossil fuels are not yet out of the picture for the total energy supply of the future.
    • On equal footing: the impact of FERC Order 841 on grid battery installations

      Lange, Ian; Oke, Anuja; McKennie, Caitlin; Colorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy (Colorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes LibraryColorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy, 2022-10-26)
      New technologies don't often "fit" within market designs as well as the incumbent technologies. As a result, subtle changes in market rules can have large impacts on new technology adoption, and their associated supply chains. This research measures the impact on grid battery installations, and the resulting lithium demand – both generated by the June 2020 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Order 841.
    • Oil & gas industry being a good neighbor: getting a license to operate through proactive community engagement

      Lindsey, Wyatt; Crompton, James; Colorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy (Colorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes LibraryColorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy, 2022-10-27)
      In the DJ Basin in Colorado, there has been a collision of industry activities and community development due to the "mini-boom" of O&G development, stemming from hydraulic fracking of the Niobrara Formation and the growing population along the Front Range. This led to a decrease in public support for industry permits starting around 2013 and an increase in operational notification requirements (Turkewitz 2018 & MacKenzie 2016). By 2013, the Front Range communities were pushing for more local control and enacting local bans of operations on O&G development to address distributive injustice and differing vulnerabilities (Turkewitz 2018 & McKenzie). 2019 saw the passage of SB-181 which made a big difference in the permitting process for O&G to emphasize public health, safety, and welfare. Over the next two-year period, the state experienced a significant restructuring of its O&G regulations and regulatory bodies (Jaffe 2022).
    • The future of oil and gas production in urban and suburban environments: "Is Colorado an example of where the North American crude oil and natural gas industry might be headed?"

      Lindsey, Wyatt; Jordan, William Owen; Crompton, James; Cheng Siew, Chiang; Colorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy (Colorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes LibraryColorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy, 2022-10-25)
      There has and is much discussion about the future of fossil fuels, specifically the oil and gas industry. With growing concern on climate change, the need for a diversified energy portfolio, incorporation of clean energies into energy production, and the expectation for an energy transition away from fossil fuels to non-carbon energy solutions, such as renewables, signifies that the energy transition has already begun. While the energy industry is transitioning due to market forces, public policies, and technological advances, fossil fuels are not yet forgotten in the total energy supply of the future.
    • Novel steel industry flaring capability at Payne Institute

      Elvidge, Christopher; Zhizhin, Mikhail; Taber, Kelly; Bazilian, Morgan; Colorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy (Colorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes LibraryColorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy, 2022-10-25)
      The Payne Institute Earth Observation Group (EOG) at Colorado School of Mines has developed a new method for detecting flaring at industrial sites with the capability to produce worldwide data on steel mills.
    • Aligning value with communities: conceptualizing a 'Carbon Steward' federal tax credit

      Ross, Ashleigh; Littlefield, Anna; Colorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy (Colorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes LibraryColorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy, 2022-10-20)
      A significant and growing risk to wide-spread deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects in the US exists not in the technical space, but rather with social license to operate. The central challenge is how to achieve the principles of environmental justice for communities when the only incentives go directly to industry, and stakeholders must negotiate for fair compensation. Here we propose that a direct to community and landowner tax credit, the 'Carbon Steward Tax Credit,' may be the solution that enables true alignment between projects and communities. Providing communities value independent of but aligned with the project or developer can promote much stronger relationships for near- and long-term deployment of CCS.
    • Supporting a just energy transition through alternative funding strategies for African hydrocarbon developments

      Freeman, Baba; Colorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy (Colorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes LibraryColorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy, 2022-10-19)
      Africa contains significant amounts of hydrocarbon reserves that contribute extensively to state revenue and facilitate social and economic development. The growth prospects for these African countries are however under threat as international financial institutions reduce their funding for hydrocarbon developments in response to global warming and its adverse effects. Given that Africa contributes less than 5 percent of global carbon emissions and has widespread energy poverty, the curtailment of funding for hydrocarbon development will create an inequitable burden on African economic development.
    • Monitoring of Portovaya gas flares

      Elvidge, Christopher; Zhizhin, Mikhail; Taber, Kelly; Bazilian, Morgan; Colorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy (Colorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes LibraryColorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy, 2022-09-12)
      Using a proprietary Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Nightfire clustering algorithm, Payne Institute scientists are monitoring two flares from Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) production facilities owned by Gazprom near Portovaya, Russia.
    • Closing the energy poverty gap in Africa using landfill gas

      Freeman, Baba; Colorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy (Colorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes LibraryColorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy, 2022-09-08)
      Energy poverty is widespread in African countries and power generation capacity has continued to lag population and economic growth. The prospects for adding generation capacity are currently diminished as global financial institutions reduce lending for carbon-based energy developments in response to the adverse effects of climate change. Concurrently, large population centers in Africa continue to generate waste that can be utilized for power generation on competitive terms using landfill gas. Power generation from landfills also has the benefit of reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with each landfill and displacing gasoline and diesel demand from use in transportation and backup power generation. Despite these attributes, the uptake of landfill gas power across Africa has been negligible. This paper highlights economic feasibility assessments of African landfill power generation projects from literature and develops options for policymakers to boost landfill gas power penetration on the continent. It concludes by proposing guidelines to enable policymakers to recognize political and market constraints and incorporate potential solutions to these constraints into future policies.
    • Shifts in the energy workforce

      McKennie, Caitlin; Bazilian, Morgan; Handler, Bradley P.; Colorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy (Colorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes LibraryColorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy, 2022-09-06)
      The recent passage of the Inflation Reduction Act heralds an unprecedented era of climate investment for the U.S. Such investment brings with it the promise of new jobs across the clean energy landscape. For rural communities that have historically depended on fossil fuel development or use, however, included several in Colorado, the outlook is at least more complicated. Nearer term, commitments in CO to close down coal plants threaten a number of jobs in specific communities. And longer term, the weaning off of oil use points to declines in employment in that sector as well.
    • On the stability of a wormhole in the maximally-extended Reissner-Nordström solution

      DeMott, Ross; Major, Sam; Flournoy, Alex
      We consider the stability of the maximally-extended Reissner-Nordström solution in a Minkowski, de Sitter, or anti-de Sitter background. In a broad class of situations, prior work has shown that spherically symmetric perturbations from a massless scalar field cause the inner horizon of an RN black hole to become singular and collapse. Even if this is the case, it may still be possible for an observer to travel through the inner horizon before it fully collapses, thus violating strong cosmic censorship. In this work, we show that the collapse of the inner horizon and the occurrence of a singularity along the inner horizon are sufficient to prevent an observer from accessing the white hole regions and the parallel universe regions of the maximally extended RN space-time. Thus, if an observer passes through the inner horizon, they will inevitably hit the central singularity. Throughout this article, we use natural units where c = G = 4 {\pi} {\epsilon}_0 = 1.
    • Mines Geophysics: revealing the dynamics of the Earth, Spring 2022

      Colorado School of Mines. Department of Geophysics
    • Geophysics: revealing the dynamics of Earth, Fall 2021

      Colorado School of Mines. Department of Geophysics
    • Geophysics: revealing the dynamics of Earth, Spring 2021

      Colorado School of Mines. Department of Geophysics
    • Geophysics: revealing the dynamics of Earth, Fall 2020

      Colorado School of Mines. Department of Geophysics
    • Geophysics: revealing the dynamics of Earth, Fall 2019

      Colorado School of Mines. Department of Geophysics
    • Geophysics: revealing the dynamics of Earth, Fall 2018

      Colorado School of Mines. Department of Geophysics