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dc.contributor.advisorLucena, Juan C.
dc.contributor.advisorTunstall, Lori E.
dc.contributor.authorStyer, Jaime
dc.date.accessioned2023-12-07T22:07:29Z
dc.date.available2023-12-07T22:07:29Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifierStyer_mines_0052N_12722.pdf
dc.identifierT 9643
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/178650
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description2023 Summer.
dc.description.abstractWhile the construction industry is an important source of income for many countries and essential to dealing with population growth and urban expansion, it is contributing to many environmental and social issues. Due to its observed contributions to pollution, carbon dioxide emissions, energy consumption, natural resource depletion, and waste generation globally, the construction sector is a well-known major contributor to environmental degradation. Although many countries are developing strategies to manage construction and demolition waste (C&DW), oftentimes, these strategies are limited to final disposal policies which ignore the potential positive impacts utilizing this waste could have on environmental, social, cultural, economic, and political levels (Mendez-Fajardo, 2011). In Latin America, significant advances in managing C&DW have been lacking. Colombia is one such country that is generating massive amounts of C&DW yet has not made significant advances in managing it until very recently. When developing solutions to treat and manage C&DW, as some groups are disproportionately exposed to and affected by adverse environmental effects due to social and economic factors, such as gender, class, race, etc., special consideration should be given to those more vulnerable to the effects of environmental degradation. Utilizing a participatory, mixed methods—primarily qualitative—approach to work with women in a low-income community in Colombia to understand how value can be extracted from C&DW safely, determine how these recycled materials can be made useful, and how to do all this in a way that enhances social cohesion in their communities, this investigation aims to connect C&DW management, empowerment, and sustainable community development by utilizing a participatory, community-based workshop. Overall, this study demonstrates the importance of using community-based participatory research and mixed methods approaches to understand how empowerment is contextually situated to ensure projects are truly empowering to the groups they intend to serve.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2023 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectconcrete
dc.subjectconstruction and demolition waste
dc.subjecthumanitarian engineering
dc.subjectsustainable community development
dc.subjectwomen's empowerment
dc.subjectworkshops
dc.titleEmpowering women in low-income communities in Colombia by extracting values from construction and demolition waste through recycling concrete
dc.typeText
dc.date.updated2023-11-30T05:09:41Z
dc.contributor.committeememberReddy, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.committeememberIdeker, Jason H.
dcterms.embargo.expires2024-11-29
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineEngineering, Design and Society
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines
dc.rights.accessEmbargo Expires: 11/29/2024


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