Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMiskimins, Jennifer L.
dc.contributor.advisorOzkan, E.
dc.contributor.authorKutun, Kagan
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-27T15:56:01Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-03T13:14:25Z
dc.date.available2018-12-27T15:56:01Z
dc.date.available2022-02-03T13:14:25Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifierKutun_mines_0052N_11653.pdf
dc.identifierT 8646
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/172832
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description2018 Fall.
dc.descriptionRevised 2021.
dc.description.abstractEnhanced geothermal systems (EGS) are analogous to the unconventional reservoirs of the oil and gas industry in size and extent. EGS reservoirs lack the presence of a reservoir fluid and a naturally permeable rock. The total energy reserves that can be classified as EGS are larger and more numerous compared to conventional geothermal systems. Unfortunately, they cannot be produced by conventional means. In order to capitalize on EGS, one must artificially induce a permeable network within these mostly igneous/crystalline rocks. The fractures allow the fluid, while being circulated from an injection to a production well, to harvest and bring some of the in-situ heat to surface. Abstract The EGS Collab is a research project sponsored by the United States Department of Energy. The aim of the project is to provide a test bed at intermediate scale with the main focus on understanding and prediction permeability enhancement in crystalline rocks. The project involves the collaboration of multiple national research laboratories and universities. The experiments take place 4850 ft below the surface in Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) located at Lead, South Dakota. Abstract In this research, the behavior of hydraulic fractures in an EGS setting is investigated numerically, using CFRAC, a hydraulic fracture simulator, to support EGS Collab. The work encompasses the prediction of the hydraulic fractures which are created within SURF, the preliminary investigations of the experimental results, and the investigation of the model's behavior in a crystalline rock setting. Abstract The modeling process produced results that agree with initial field results. The experimental hydraulic fractures are affected by the presence of the mine drift and natural fractures. Presence of a natural fracture halted the growth of the hydraulic fracture. Furthermore, the preliminary analysis of the experimental data showed that an active natural fracture network can influence the falloff signal to a degree that the closure events are masked completely.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2018 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectenhanced geothermal systems
dc.subjectfracture modeling
dc.subjectEGS Collab
dc.subjecthot dry rock
dc.subjectFORGE
dc.titleHydraulic fracture modeling of an enhanced geothermal system (EGS) experiment
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.committeememberYin, Xiaolong
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnston, Henry
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplinePetroleum Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Kutun_mines_revised.pdf
Size:
18.39Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record