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dc.contributor.advisorSava, Paul C.
dc.contributor.authorPawelec, Iga
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-26T15:12:09Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-03T13:15:18Z
dc.date.available2018-10-26T15:12:09Z
dc.date.available2022-02-03T13:15:18Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifierPawelec_mines_0052N_11624.pdf
dc.identifierT 8615
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/172615
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description2018 Fall.
dc.description.abstractTo make informed decisions, one has to consider all available knowledge about the assessed problem. An important part of the decision-making process is understanding uncertainties and how they influence the outcome. In seismic exploration, many decisions are based on interpretations of seismic images, which are affected by multiple sources of uncertainty. Thus, image uncertainty quantification is an important, albeit challenging task. In this thesis, I focus on two uncertainty sources that affect seismic imaging: data uncertainty and velocity uncertainty. I quantify the seismic data uncertainty using theoretical analysis applied to two field experiments with repeated shots. My analysis reveals that amplitude distributions for each data sample as a function of time and position are not Gaussian and that the uncertainty of a seismic event is proportional to its mean amplitude. I also find that seismic events excited by the source are highly repeatable, but small changes of the source position impact the amplitude response, highlighting the importance of geometry repeatability for the lapse studies. Velocity uncertainty also has a large impact on image uncertainty, as it affects reflector positioning and the focusing of seismic events. By examining two subsalt imaging scenarios with geological uncertainty caused by the salt body physical properties, I demonstrate that image uncertainty, expressed as a function of the image amplitude or as a function of the reflector location, is the largest under the salt: the image amplitude distributions are two times broader under the salt than away from it. The confidence index maps are a useful tool to convey the information about image amplitude uncertainty to an interpreter, while the location uncertainty reveals uncertain directions and is affected by acquisition geometry. The main challenges facing uncertainty quantification in seismic imaging include integration of different sources of uncertainty and reducing the computational cost of the analysis. My analysis leads to recommendations about possible approaches towards these challenges, with emphasis on using sparsity to reduce the dimensionality of the problem.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2010-2019 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectseismic imaging
dc.subjectdata uncertainty
dc.subjectuncertainty quantification
dc.titleUncertainty quantification in seismic imaging
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.committeememberWakin, Michael B.
dc.contributor.committeememberTrainor-Guitton, Whitney
dc.contributor.committeememberSnieder, Roel, 1958-
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineGeophysics
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines


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