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dc.contributor.advisorHogue, Terri S.
dc.contributor.advisorKroepsch, Adrianne
dc.contributor.authorDolan, Flannery C.
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-30T16:01:05Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-03T13:11:08Z
dc.date.available2018-11-29T16:01:05Z
dc.date.available2022-02-03T13:11:08Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifierDolan_mines_0052N_11508.pdf
dc.identifierT 8505
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/172336
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description2018 Spring.
dc.description.abstractThis research explores the reuse of produced water, a byproduct of oil and gas production. Produced water represents a substantial volume in oil and gas production that is usually disposed of in a Class II injection well. This practice is costly and has been shown to cause induced seismicity. Reusing produced water eliminates the need to dispose of it and provides a viable new source of water to an ever-growing world. This research first looks at the feasibility of reusing produced water for agriculture in Colorado, including evaluation of the legal, economic, technological, and environmental aspects of such use. Three research questions are addressed in this work: first, in which counties in Colorado is reuse for agriculture most feasible; second, what is the volumetric impact of produced water on irrigation demand in these counties; and third, is the reuse of produced water for agriculture economically feasible in these counties. Results show that Rio Blanco, Garfield, Washington, Weld, Las Animas, and La Plata Counties are the primary counties in Colorado where reuse for agriculture is most feasible based on water demand, quantity of produced water and quality of produced water. Produced water is found to make a substantial volumetric impact on irrigation demand in some of these counties. Using an integrated Decision Selection Tool, the cost of treating the produced water in these counties is found to be more than the cost of disposal in a private injection well but less than the cost of disposal in a commercial injection well. The second part of this thesis looks at the utilization of produced water on a broader scale and applies a version of Multi-Attribute Decision Analysis to the problem. Several alternatives are compared, including disposal and some reuse options. Objectives are discussed, including health, environmental impact, resource availability, and economic feasibility. Some general areas of the United States are recommended where reuse of produced water may be most beneficial. Additionally, the sensitivity of weights of different criteria are evaluated. Overall, results from this research will help inform stakeholders in how best to manage produced water.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2010-2019 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectdecision making
dc.subjectreuse
dc.subjectagriculture
dc.subjectwater resources
dc.subjectproduced water
dc.titleReusing produced water: viability and decision-making
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.committeememberCath, Tzahi Y.
dc.contributor.committeememberHiggins, Christopher P.
dcterms.embargo.terms2018-11-29
dcterms.embargo.expires2018-11-29
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil and Environmental Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines
dc.rights.accessEmbargo Expires: 11/29/2018


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