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dc.contributor.advisorLiang, Hongjun
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Yunjiang
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T07:15:33Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-03T12:52:47Z
dc.date.available2016-06-01T04:18:44Z
dc.date.available2022-02-03T12:52:47Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifierT 7777
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/17135
dc.description2015 Spring.
dc.descriptionIncludes illustrations (some color).
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 62-66).
dc.description.abstractMembrane-active antimicrobial peptides and their synthetic mimics have been studied extensively as a new generation of antibiotics to fight against the persistent evolution of pathogens that resist traditional antibiotic treatment. It has long been recognized that a delicate yet un-quantified balance between amphiphilicity and cationic charge is key to optimize the bactericidal efficiency and selectivity of these membrane-active antimicrobials (MAAs). The dilemma, however, is that the amphiphilic nature of MAAs that gives rise to their potency in disrupting microbial membranes is oftentimes also detrimental to human cells. Hydrophilic antimicrobial peptides and polymers generally have good biocompatibility, but they have received much less attention due to their low antimicrobial activity. In this work, we investigate whether polymer microstructure can be tuned to help hydrophilic polymers acquire high antimicrobial activity and selectivity. We evaluate and compare the different antimicrobial properties of linear and branched Poly(4-vinyl-N-methylpyridine iodide) (P4MVP) that are both hydrophilic and cationic. We show that P4MVP polymers can be designed as potent antimicrobial agents with negligible toxicity. We reveal a simple size-dependent antimicrobial activity and selectivity relationship that applies to both linear and branched P4MVP polymers. We also investigate the antimicrobial mechanism of P4MVP with different microstructures. We find that the antimicrobial potency of P4MVP is associated with their ability to remodel microbial membrane lipids by inducing a topological transition to form a two-dimensional inverted hexagonal structure, where P4MVP chains reside in the middle of the hexagonally packed lipid "pores". Collectively, our results show that it is possible to find another pathway to fight against the antibiotics-resistant pathogens by developing hydrophilic and cationic polymers that have both high antimicrobial activity and low toxicity.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2015 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subject.lcshPeptide antibiotics
dc.subject.lcshAmphiphiles
dc.subject.lcshPolymers -- Synthesis
dc.subject.lcshAntimicrobial polymers
dc.subject.lcshMicrostructure
dc.titleHydrophilic and cationic polymers as potent antimicrobial materials: another pathway to fight tough bacterial infections
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.committeememberYang, Yongan
dc.contributor.committeememberSpear, John R.
dc.contributor.committeememberNeeves, Keith B.
dcterms.embargo.terms2016-06-01
dcterms.embargo.expires2016-06-01
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineMetallurgical and Materials Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines


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