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dc.contributor.advisorLi, Yaoguo
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Cericia D.
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T07:13:58Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-03T12:51:10Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T07:13:58Z
dc.date.available2022-02-03T12:51:10Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifierT 7752
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/17110
dc.description2015 Spring.
dc.descriptionIncludes illustrations (some color), maps (some color).
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 186-195).
dc.description.abstractIn the past two decades, commercialization of previously classified instrumentation has provided the ability to rapidly collect quality gravity gradient measurements for resource exploration. In the near future, next-generation instrumentation are expected to further advance acquisition of higher-quality data not subject to pre-processing regulations. Conversely, the ability to process and interpret gravity gradiometry data has not kept pace with innovations occurring in data acquisition systems. The purpose of the research presented in this thesis is to contribute to the understanding, development, and application of processing and interpretation techniques available for airborne gravity gradiometry in resource exploration. In particular, this research focuses on the utility of 3D inversion of gravity gradiometry for interpretation purposes. Towards this goal, I investigate the requisite components for an integrated interpretation workflow. In addition to practical 3D inversions, components of the workflow include estimation of density for terrain correction, processing of multi-component data using equivalent source for denoising, quantification of noise level, and component conversion. The objective is to produce high quality density distributions for subsequent geological interpretation. I then investigate the use of the inverted density model in orebody imaging, lithology differentiation, and resource evaluation. The systematic and sequential approach highlighted in the thesis addresses some of the challenges facing the use of gravity gradiometry as an exploration tool, while elucidating a procedure for incorporating gravity gradient interpretations into the lifecycle of not only resource exploration, but also resource modeling.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2010-2019 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectprocessing
dc.subjectpotential-fields
dc.subjectmineral exploration
dc.subjectinterpretation
dc.subjectgravity gradiometry
dc.subject3D inversion
dc.subject.lcshAirborne gravimetry
dc.subject.lcshGravity -- Measurement
dc.subject.lcshInversion (Geophysics)
dc.subject.lcshProspecting -- Geophysical methods
dc.subject.lcshData processing
dc.titleQuantitative interpretation of airborne gravity gradiometry data for mineral exploration
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.committeememberHitzman, Murray Walter
dc.contributor.committeememberDagdelen, Kadri
dc.contributor.committeememberSava, Paul C.
dc.contributor.committeememberKrahenbuhl, Richard A.
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineGeophysics
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines


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