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dc.contributor.advisorThomas, B. G. (Brian G.)
dc.contributor.authorBlaes, Carly M.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-16T16:50:57Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-03T13:01:24Z
dc.date.available2017-06-16T16:50:57Z
dc.date.available2022-02-03T13:01:24Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifierT 8298
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/171023
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description2017 Spring.
dc.description.abstractIn the continuous casting of steel, many complex phenomena in the meniscus region of the mold are responsible for the formation of oscillation marks. Oscillation marks are depressions found around the perimeter of continuously cast steel slabs, which if too large can lead to cracking in steel slabs. Therefore, knowledge on how to minimize the size of oscillation marks is very valuable. A computational model was created of the meniscus region, which includes transient multiphase fluid flow of slag and steel, with low-Reynolds turbulence, heat transfer in the mold, slag, and steel, steel shell solidification, mold oscillation, and temperature-dependent properties. This model was first validated using previous experimental and plant data. The model was then used to study the impact of varying casting parameters, including oscillation frequency, stroke, modification ratio, casting speed, molten steel level fluctuations, and temperature-dependent slag properties and surface tension on the oscillation mark shape, and other aspects of thermal-flow behavior during each oscillation cycle, including heat flux profile, slag consumption and mold friction. The first half of oscillation marks were formed during negative strip time as the slag rim pushed molten steel away from the mold wall and that the second half of oscillation marks were formed during positive strip time as the molten steel is drawn near the mold wall due to the upstroke of the mold. Oscillation mark depth was found to decrease with increasing frequency, modification ratio, casting speed, and slag viscosity, while oscillation mark depth was found to increase with increasing stroke. Oscillation mark width was only found to increase due to increases in pitch, which can be contributed to decreasing frequency or increasing casting speed. While many observations were made in this study, in general, oscillation mark depth and total slag consumption increase with increasing negative strip time, while the average heat flux and average mold friction decrease with increasing negative strip time.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2017 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectCFD
dc.subjectmarks
dc.subjectsteel
dc.subjectcontinuous
dc.subjectcasting
dc.subjectoscillation
dc.titleInvestigation of meniscus region behavior and oscillation mark formation in steel continuous casting using a transient thermo-fluid model
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.committeememberBogin, Gregory E.
dc.contributor.committeememberTilton, Nils
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines


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