Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorYin, Xiaolong
dc.contributor.authorDang, Angela K.
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-29T13:36:03Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-03T12:58:02Z
dc.date.available2016-06-29T13:36:03Z
dc.date.available2022-02-03T12:58:02Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifierT 8080
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/170307
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description2016 Summer.
dc.description.abstractAs early as the 1950s, the need to track water in various applications, including stream water, sanitary systems, ground water, and oil field water flooding, resulted in the development of chemical tracer technologies. While the utilization of tracer technologies to track water during reservoir development is mature, the use of chemical tracers in unconventional hydraulic fracturing operations is relatively new. With the increasing use of chemical tracers in unconventional settings, questions related to the proper execution, interpretation, and integration of chemical tracer tests arise. The first part of this research discusses the design and analysis of a tracer study conducted in a section of the Wattenberg Field, Colorado. The results of the tracer study showed that the preferential direction of cross-well tracer flow during hydraulic fracturing reflected the order of completion rather than the geology. However, large geologic features, such as a faulted graben, can facilitate cross-well transport of water-based chemical tracers during fracturing. Minor faults between wells can facilitate cross-well transport of oil-based chemical tracers during production. Furthermore, the percentage of recovered tracers from different intervals along the wellbore varies, which can reflect the contribution of that interval to the net production. Based on the analysis, suggestions on how to conduct a tracer study to obtain high-quality data are provided. The second part of this research shows how the results of the tracer study can be integrated into a post-treatment hydraulic fracturing model to evaluate production efficiency. Using the fractional production flowback results from the chemical tracer study, hydraulic fractures were calibrated to match the fractional production from each interval. The fracture model provides insight into what the hydraulic fractures look like, potential communication avenues for the chemical tracers, and production efficiency.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2010-2019 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectchemical tracer
dc.subjecthydraulic fracture
dc.subjecthydraulic fracture modeling
dc.subjectpost-treatment
dc.titlePost-treatment horizontal hydraulic fracture modeling with integrated chemical tracer analysis, a case study
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Thomas L. (Thomas Leonard), 1947-
dc.contributor.committeememberOzkan, E.
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplinePetroleum Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Dang_mines_0052N_10993.pdf
Size:
3.166Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record