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dc.contributor.advisorEberhart, Mark E.
dc.contributor.authorMorgenstern, Amanda
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-24T14:10:00Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-03T12:57:13Z
dc.date.available2016-05-24T14:10:00Z
dc.date.available2022-02-03T12:57:13Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifierT 8027
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/170114
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description2016 Spring.
dc.description.abstractThe "chemical bond" is a central concept in molecular sciences, but there is no consensus as to what a bond actually is. Therefore, a variety of bonding models have been developed, each defining the structure of molecules in a different manner with the goal of explaining and predicting chemical properties. While many twentieth century bonding models provide useful information for a variety of chemical systems, these models are sometimes less insightful for more lofty goals such as designing metalloenzymes. The design process of novel catalysts could be improved if more predictive and accurate models of chemical bonding are created. One recently developed bonding model based on the topology of the electron charge density is the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). QTAIM defines bonding interactions as one-dimensional ridges of electron density, ρ(r), which are known as bond paths. As with any bonding model, there are instances where bond paths do not adequately describe properties of interest, such as in the analysis of histone deacetylase. This thesis describes the initial development of gradient bundle analysis (GBA), a chemical bonding model that creates a higher resolution picture of chemical interactions within the charge density framework. GBA is based on concepts from QTAIM, but uses a more complete picture of the topology and geometry of ρ(r) to understand and predict bonding interactions. Gradient bundles are defined as volumes bounded by zero-flux surfaces (ZFSs) in the gradient of the charge density with well-defined energies. The structure of gradient bundles provides an avenue for detecting the locations of valence electrons, which correspond to reactive regions in a molecule. The number of electrons in bonding regions, which are defined by the lowering of kinetic energy in gradient bundles, is found to correlate to bond dissociation energy in diatomic molecules. Furthermore, site reactivity can be understood and predicted by observing the motion of ZFSs bounding gradient bundles and calculating condensed gradient bundle Fukui functions. Using only the ground state charge density, I present preliminary results for a method that predicts which regions in a molecule are most likely to undergo nucleophilic and electrophilic attack, effectively locating the HOMO and LUMO.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2010-2019 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectchemical bonding
dc.subjectgradient bundles
dc.subjectmetalloenzyme design
dc.subjectquantum theory of atoms in molecules
dc.subjectzero-flux surfaces
dc.titleGradient bundle analysis: a full topological approach to chemical bonding
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.committeememberWu, David T.
dc.contributor.committeememberAlexandrova, Anastassia N., 1978-
dc.contributor.committeememberMaupin, C. Mark
dc.contributor.committeememberVyas, Shubham
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistry and Geochemistry
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines


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