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dc.contributor.advisorVan Tyne, C. J.
dc.contributor.authorRothleutner, Lee M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-09T17:07:31Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-03T12:56:02Z
dc.date.available2016-02-09T17:07:31Z
dc.date.available2022-02-03T12:56:02Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifierT 7963
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/170024
dc.description2016 Spring.
dc.descriptionIncludes illustrations (some color).
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractVanadium microalloying of medium-carbon bar steels is a common practice in industry for a number of hot rolled as well as forged and controlled-cooled components. However, use of vanadium microalloyed steels has expanded into applications beyond their originally designed controlled-cooled processing scheme. Applications such as transmission shafts often require additional heat-treatments such as quench and tempering and/or induction hardening to meet packaging or performance requirements. As a result, there is uncertainty regarding the influence of vanadium on the properties of heat-treated components, specifically the effect of rapid heat-treating such as induction hardening. In the current study, the microstructural evolution and torsional fatigue behavior of induction hardened 1045 and 10V45 (0.08 wt pct V) steels were examined. Torsional fatigue specimens specifically designed for this research were machined from the as-received, hot rolled bars and induction hardened using both scanning (96 kHz/72 kW) and single-shot (31 kHz/128 kW) methods. Four conditions were evaluated, three scan hardened to 25, 32, and 44 pct nominal effective case depths and one single-shot hardened to 44 pct. Torsional fatigue tests were conducted at a stress ratio of 0.1 and shear stress amplitudes of 550, 600, and 650 MPa. Physical simulations using the thermal profiles from select induction hardened conditions were conducted in the Gleeble® 3500 to augment microstructural analysis of torsional fatigue specimens. Thermal profiles were calculated by a collaborating private company using electro-thermal finite element analysis. Residual stresses were evaluated for all conditions using a strain gage hole drilling technique. The results showed that vanadium microalloying has an influence on the microstructure in the highest hardness region of the induction-hardened case as well as the total case region. Vanadium microalloyed conditions consistently exhibited a greater amount of non-martensitic transformation products in the induction-hardened case. In the total case region, vanadium reduced the total case depth by inhibiting austenite formation at low austenitizing temperatures; however, the non-martensitic constituents in the case microstructure and the reduced total case depth of the vanadium microalloyed steel did not translate directly to a degradation of torsional fatigue properties. In general, vanadium microalloying was not found to affect torsional fatigue performance significantly with one exception. In the 25 pct effective case depth condition, the 10V45 steel had a ~75 pct increase in fatigue life at all shear stress amplitudes when compared to the 1045 steel. The improved fatigue performance is likely a result of the significantly higher case hardness this condition exhibited compared to all other conditions. The direct influence of vanadium on the improved fatigue life of the 25 pct effective case depth condition is confounded with the slightly higher carbon content of the 10V45 steel. In addition, the 10V45 conditions showed a consistently higher case hardness than the in 1045 conditions. The increased hardness of the 10V45 steel did not increase the compressive residual stresses at the surface. Induction hardening parameters were more closely related to changes in residual stress than vanadium microalloying additions. Torsional fatigue data from the current study as well as from literature were used to develop an empirical multiple linear regression model that accounts for case depth as well as carbon content when predicting torsional fatigue life of induction hardened medium-carbon steels.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2016 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectinduction hardening
dc.subjectmedium carbon steel
dc.subjectmicroalloying
dc.subjecttorsional fatigue
dc.subjectvanadium
dc.titleAssessment of the microstructure and torsional fatigue performance of an induction hardened vanadium microalloyed medium-carbon steel
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.committeememberHering, Amanda S.
dc.contributor.committeememberKrauss, George, 1933-
dc.contributor.committeememberSpeer, J. G.
dc.contributor.committeememberFindley, Kip Owen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineMetallurgical and Materials Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines


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