Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLiu, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorGonzales, Devon Scott
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T16:44:31Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-03T12:52:30Z
dc.date.available2016-07-18T04:18:44Z
dc.date.available2022-02-03T12:52:30Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifierT 7947
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/170006
dc.description2015 Fall.
dc.descriptionIncludes illustrations (some color).
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractElectron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) is a technique, developed at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC), which uses a computerized numerical controlled electron beam welder and a wire feed system to fabricate large scale aerospace parts. Advantages of using EBF3 as opposed to conventional manufacturing methods include decreased deign-to-product time, decreased wasted material, and the ability to adapt controls to produce geometrically complex parts. The EBF3 process is compatible with a range of aerospace alloys and material properties of parts produced by this process have been shown to be comparable to wrought products. However, to fully exploit the potential of the EBF3 process, development of materials tailored for the process is required. This research used alloy theory, as well as powder cored tubular wire technology, to develop aluminum based metal matrix composite feedstock for the EBF3 system. Five iterations of powder cored tubular wire were made using silicon carbide particulates with different surface conditions. Uncoated particles, as well as particles with high and low amounts of copper and nickel coatings, were incorporated into the powder core. Single and multiple layer deposits were made using each wire. Beam conditions were varied for each wire to determine the optimal combination of feedstock material and electron beam parameters required to create a uniformly distributed metal matrix composite deposit using EBF3. Completely uniform dispersion of the reinforcement particles was not achieved in the matrix, however, it was determined that nickel additions enhanced particle dispersion as well as mitigated solidification cracking and secondary carbide formation. It was also determined that using a lower energy beam also promotes dispersion and mitigates secondary carbide formation. Computational models were created to predict phase transformations and particle dispersion in the matrix for various conditions. The thermodynamic and fluid dynamic models were able to describe trends observed through characterization of EBF3 depositions. Results collected from characterization of the deposits as well as trends observed in the models can be used to plan future iterations of powder cored tubular wire feedstock, as well as deposition parameters, to create homogeneous metal matrix composite structures by Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2010-2019 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectadditive manufacturing
dc.subjectmetal matrix composites
dc.titleDevelopment of metal matrix composite powder cored tubular wire for electron beam freeform fabrication
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.committeememberBourne, Gerald
dc.contributor.committeememberYu, Zhenzhen
dc.contributor.committeememberDomack, Marcia S.
dc.contributor.committeememberHafley, Robert A.
dcterms.embargo.terms2016-07-18
dcterms.embargo.expires2016-07-18
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineMetallurgical and Materials Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines
dc.rights.accessEmbargo Expires: 07/18/2016


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Gonzales_mines_0052N_10908.pdf
Size:
11.42Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record