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dc.contributor.authorBowser, Brooke
dc.contributor.authorHandler, Bradley P.
dc.contributor.authorLittlefield, Anna
dc.contributor.authorBazilian, Morgan
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-08T19:53:33Z
dc.date.available2022-08-08T19:53:33Z
dc.date.issued2022-07-15
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/14628
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.25676/11124/14628
dc.description.abstractThe oil and gas industry began injecting carbon dioxide into the ground in the 1970s as a technique to produce more oil (now called enhanced oil recovery), but today there is a renewed interest in CO2 injection for carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects — this time as a way to address climate change. Despite CCS technology itself being decades-old, persistent regulatory and liability questions paired with limited economic viability threaten development, even as the industry appears to be gathering momentum for large-scale growth.
dc.format.mediumcommentaries
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartofPublications - Payne Institute
dc.relation.ispartofPayne Institute Commentary Series: Commentary
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the authors.
dc.titleClearing the non-technical hurdles for CCS
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.institutionColorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy
dc.publisher.originalColorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy


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