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dc.contributor.authorTilton, John E.
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-02T23:03:20Z
dc.date.available2022-06-02T23:03:20Z
dc.date.issued2018-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/14062
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.25676/11124/14062
dc.description.abstractShortages of mineral commodities can arise for numerous reasons--mineral depletion, inadequate investment in new mines and processing facilities, unanticipated surges in demand, cartels, embargoes, wars, mine accidents, and even prolonged strikes. It is useful, however, to separate mineral commodity shortages into two distinct groups. The first includes shortages due to mineral depletion; the second, shortages owing to all other causes. The two types of shortages differ in almost all respects.
dc.format.mediumcommentaries
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartofPublications - Payne Institute
dc.relation.ispartofPayne Institute Commentary Series: Working Paper
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.titleOur mental models of mineral depletion—and why they matter
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.institutionColorado School of Mines. Payne Institute for Public Policy
dc.publisher.originalPayne Institute for Public Policy


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