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dc.contributor.advisorSkokan, C. K.
dc.contributor.advisorMunoz, David (David R.)
dc.contributor.authorAsheim, Michael J.
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T06:38:09Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-09T08:55:35Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T06:38:09Z
dc.date.available2022-02-09T08:55:35Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifierT 7588
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/12286
dc.description2014 Fall.
dc.descriptionIncludes illustrations (some color).
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 88-92).
dc.description.abstractAs wind technology becomes a larger portion of the energy production picture, the problematic interactions between the machines and society will continue to become more pronounced. Of these problems, wind turbine noise is one of the most important to the future of wind turbine development. This study looks at the effect trailing edge brushes mounted on the 2 bladed Controls Advance Research Turbine (CART 2), located at the National Wind Technology Center, have on the overall acoustic and aerodynamic performance of the blades. The use of trailing edge brushes reduced the aeroacoustic noise by 1.0 to 5.0 dB over the baseline blade, depending on wind speed. This acoustic performance comes at a cost to the aerodynamic performance of the blades. The aerodynamic performance indicators, such as turbine power and root bending moments show that increased drag due to the brushes is the main contributor to the reduction in power production. An economic analysis also investigated how to best use noise mitigation devices to optimize acoustic, power performance and loads of a 600 kW baseline turbine, such as the CART 2. The analysis shows that the use of up a noise mitigation device of 4 dB is best used by increasing the rotor diameter and the power rating of the machine, from a 43.3 m diameter, 600 kW machine to a 68.8 m diameter, 886.7 kW machine. This increase resulted in an annual energy production increase of 414% when using a Rayleigh wind distribution with at a mean annual wind speed of 8.5 m/s. This is a reduction of cost of energy from $0.0463 per kWh to $0.0422 kWh. This reduction in energy production costs helps to explain the continuing trend of turbine machine growth in both rotor diameter and power rating.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2010-2019 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectturbine
dc.subjectnoise
dc.subjectwind
dc.subjectmitigation
dc.subjectbrushes
dc.subject.lcshWind turbines -- Noise -- Measurement
dc.subject.lcshWind turbines -- Aerodynamics
dc.subject.lcshAeroacoustics
dc.subject.lcshTrailing edges (Aerodynamics)
dc.subject.lcshWind power
dc.titleMeasurement of aeroacoustic noise generated on wind turbine blades modified by trailing edge brushes
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.committeememberKaffine, Daniel
dc.contributor.committeememberCollis, Jon M.
dc.contributor.committeememberMoriarty, Patrick
dc.contributor.committeememberNguyen, Khanh
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines


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